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7 of the Worst Stereotypes About Black Fathers

The conventional wisdom about absent Black fathers has turned the idea of Black fatherhood into an anomaly, an oxymoron, in the eyes of many. But the statistics don’t back up this notion of the negligent, irresponsible Black father.

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Black Fathers Aren’t Involved in Their Children’s Lives

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, African-American fathers spend more time in their children’s day-to-day lives than dads from other racial groups. The Pew Research Center has found similar evidence that Black dads don’t differ from white dads in any significant way, and that there isn’t the expected disparity found in so many other reports. Although Black fathers are more likely to live in separate households, Pew estimates that 67 percent of Black dads who don’t live with their kids see them at least once a month, compared to 59 percent of white dads and just 32 percent of Hispanic dads.

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2 thoughts on “7 of the Worst Stereotypes About Black Fathers

  1. Ann Eds says:

    #7 is very true. However, once the mother realizes the father is trying, she gives him access to the child and in some instances looks out for employment opportunities for the child's father.

  2. "However, once the mother realizes the father is trying, she gives him access to the child and in some instances looks out for employment opportunities for the child's father."Like you said sometimes this happens. Often times what happens is the mother pushes the father out the childs' life, whether or not he's paying child support. Why and how? Because, she has the power to with the backing of the court. Reasons? Often times, there's another man on the scene, and that other man she "gets along with", the mother what's him to be the dad. So, the mother uses her inordinate power via family court and pushes the biological dad out of the child's life because "he's in the way." Also, mostly the mother simply abuses the power she has as a custodial parent, and if the biological father doesn't do as she says, then she sic's the family court system on the dad, usually via child support.

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