Trending Topics

Obama Taps Loretta Lynch to Become Nation’s First Black Female Attorney General

HLB-W12_12008-e1389800517104President Obama, a figure who makes history virtually every time he steps out of bed in the morning, is about to do something historic once again, as he has announced he is replacing the first African-American Attorney General, Eric Holder, with the first African-American female Attorney General, Loretta Lynch.

In choosing Lynch, 55, Obama is offering a gift to every critic in the Black community who has castigated him for the scarcity of Black women in his cabinet’s inner circle. But while Holder was a close Obama confidant, the president doesn’t appear to have any close personal ties to Lynch—a fact that’s being hailed in the mainstream media as a major plus for a president who has been criticized by Washington insiders for not reaching outside his circle enough. In Washington, you get bonus points for hiring people you don’t know.

Holder was lauded in the Black community during his tenure for his bold and brash commitment to changing the justice system to be fairer and more equitable for African Americans and his desire to hold law enforcement and government accountable for too frequent abuse of African Americans.

But though it’s not clear whether Lynch will be as strong an advocate for African Americans, she has not been afraid to talk about racial bias she has personally encountered.

When she was asked in 2012 by a journal at Harvard Law School, from which she graduated in 1984, whether she had experienced racial bias in her career, Lynch said, “You mean when I was a young associate when I went to take a deposition and everyone assumed I was the court reporter. Or when I interviewed at a law firm and the receptionist looked at me and said: ‘You can’t be Loretta Lynch. She goes to Harvard.’ I think everyone has those stories.”

“Most African-Americans are very cognizant of assimilating into mainstream culture, but you’re also very aware of and very comfortable with your own culture,” she said. “To me, that’s an advantage. I think it makes you flexible; it makes you see things from more than one perspective. I look at people who have only one experience, and I think that’s really unfortunate. That’s where those comments come from. In their worldview, this is how they see black people. I learned a long time ago, I can’t really change your worldview. You can get to know me, you can spend time with me, and if your worldview changes as a result of that, fine. But it’s really not my job to try to change it.”

Lynch has shown that she has the courage to go after the New York Police Department and public officials when they step over into criminal behavior. One of her most prominent cases was the successful prosecution of members of the NYPD in the infamous Abner Louima case in 1997. Louima, 30, a Haitian immigrant, was beaten and sodomized with a broom handle by police officers in Brooklyn, who caused extensive internal damage. The case was such a racial tinderbox in the city that it prompted widespread protests and angry marches led by Rev. Al Sharpton and other activists.

Discussing the Louima case, Lynch told the Harvard Law School bulletin, “It was a very tense atmosphere. It was extremely racially and politically charged at the time. My way of dealing with high-profile cases like that is to completely separate from the press. What you have to do is insulate yourself.”

Lynch said the Louima case helped her understand why she did prosecutorial work.

“There were people who, until I worked on the Louima case, thought, Why do you do this? To me, I do it because I think everyone deserves protection,” she said. “Frankly, it shouldn’t be an easy thing to stand up and say this person by their actions has forfeited their right to walk among free people.”

Lynch is considered low-key and relatively unassuming, which is quite a statement in New York, a city used to federal prosecutors with big egos and a thirst for the spotlight—after all, former New York Mayor Rudy Giuliani rose to prominence as a crusading federal prosecutor.

Overseeing federal prosecutions in the Eastern District of New York, which includes Brooklyn, Queens, Staten Island and Long Island, Lynch leads an office that has become renowned for its work on organized crime, terrorism and public corruption.

According to the Times, her office is noteworthy for winning a rare death-penalty conviction for Ronell Wilson, who killed a police officer.

Gerald L. Shargel, a prominent defense lawyer, told the Times that Lynch was remarkably approachable.

“Any time I had an issue with a case and thought it appropriate to knock on her door, she was welcoming and gave, as U.S. attorney, gave the impression — and I think it’s a true impression — that she is fairly considering issues that you’re putting before her,” Shargel said. “There’s no self-aggrandizement.”

New York Senator Charles E. Schumer, who twice recommended Lynch to the White House as a United States attorney, released a statement calling her “a consummate professional.”

She “has a first-rate legal mind and is committed in her bones to the equal application of justice for all people,” the statement said.

The president is scheduled to appear with Lynch and Holder in an official announcement at the White House this afternoon.

Democrats may try to push for her confirmation next week during a lame-duck congressional session while they still control the Senate. But Senator Mitch McConnell, the Republican leader, said the nomination “should be considered in the new Congress, through regular order.”

Lynch for six years was an associate at the New York law firm Cahill Gordon & Reindel before becoming a federal prosecutor.

What people are saying

9 thoughts on “Obama Taps Loretta Lynch to Become Nation’s First Black Female Attorney General

  1. Paul Ski says:

    It's almost 2015, can we stop describing people by their skin color?

  2. John Nicoletti says:

    She seems like a good choice, but, people in positions such as this, should be chosen based on merit—-not because they are black or female. That would be discriminatory. The politically correct types out there should be careful, because, the more incompetence in politics and business, the quicker America and it's citizens go down the tubes. We all suffer for bad decisions at the high levels. Perhaps the 'writer' of this article could have chosen a different headline.

  3. I do not care for prosecutors, as they are the ones who work to throw you in jail, we have entirely too many black males in prison. We have thousands who can get out right now if Obama drops US vs Blewett, regarding redress, in drug sentencing disparity. She certainly will be good for US vs Blewett. I am willing to bet she personally prosecuted many of these men who can get out, so essentially she will be working to keep them in prison, having been victims of sentencing disparities. Having said that, I believe if she is not confirmed before the majority of the senate and house take their seat come first 2015, she will be NOT be confirmed. Only a prediction on her confirmation.

  4. Jay Contreras says:

    Black people are STILL getting played. It matters not if a black or white pawn is used in the game of white supremacy. The point is to MAINTAIN & PROTECT white supremacy. By ANY means necessary. If they need to use a black face to do it; so be it. They don't care. But best believe that black face is NOT doing anything of substance to dismantle or change fundamentally the SYSTEM of white supremacy. What did Holder DO besides talk out both sides of his mouth? What has Obama DONE to fundamentally change the system? If you are honest, he is nothing but a continuation of Bush. Let's be honest, black people. And it's the same game being played worldwide. Mandela..though he was heralded as another major change–simply became the face of continued white rule (economic) in S. Africa. Conditions for the avg black S. African haven't improved. It's psychological. And it worked & so they took the show on the road and brought it here. What I want to know is: Do we want FULL FREEDOM or do we just want a dressed up prisoner of war jail cell with a black guard instead of a white one? And another thing: THIS chick already has her orders–I wouldn't TRUST ANY so called highest 'crime' enforcement officer in the land with the last name of LYNCH..she's already telling you what her job will be. lol..(or law enforcement for the blind)

  5. Jay Comtreras Everything you said in your post is true. What I said in my post is something I have been sharing and trying to get blacks to move on Obama, regarding what he is doing against black males and black females, incarcerated on disparities in drug sentences. He is fighting to keep these people in prison.When we give the people something and they still sit as if it does not matter, is crazy, I don't even see families members doing anything, if they make some noise, especially coming up to the election, he will change his tune, it makes no sense why blacks refuse to stand up when we have been misused. Most of these attorneys have worked on both sides of the isles, but when I see a black prosecutor, a red flag pops up, how can a black prosecutor work their butts off to put a black man in prison, because right out the gate the whole system is against him, starting with most of the laws regarding criminal justice, there are laws on the books in which mostly blacks males are convicted of violating, drugs laws no doubt about it, they came back in 2010 and changed the law but is still flawed, then Obama refuse to allow those who were discriminated against, to take advantage of the new law, because they had already been convicted before the law took effect. This along is enough for every last black and white who love justice to not vote for the Democratic party, until they get straight with these black males and Latinos. Many blacks will say this does not affect me, but it does because the action on Obama's part speaks volumes about how he feel about black people. Then he is using the analogy, appointing Ms. Lynch, black female, will nip the complaints in the bud about how he feel about blacks. Not hardly Mr. President, I need to remind you, you are about to leave office, the damage has already been done. You cannot play all of us Mr. Obama, I believe your handling of black people issues have damaged their affillation with the party, it certainly has mine, all because of you. You should get right with these blacks Mr. President, it is wrong what you are doing. By all means I am not through with this. Don't be surprise to see me in front of the white house one morning with my sign that says free all black drugs offenders because of a racist law.

  6. Jay Contreras says:

    Nzingha Shabaka This is all a game. Obama KNOWS that woman doesn't have a snowball chance in hell of being approved now since the mid term (s)election. It's a ruse. To make it APPEAR that he is concerned with black people. It's the same game Conyers has played for decades in relation to Reparations. APPEAR to submit legislation that he KNOWS doesn't have any chance of being passed BUT when he had favorable conditions–he mysteriously sat on it and didn't even introduce it. It's a frickin' game these gatekeepers play on behalf of 'massa'..they ain't givin' up their good 'vittles' to go back and toil in the cotton fields. Black people need to get hip to this damn game. This system ONLY exists b/c WE going along with it. Whites couldn't do this by themselves. They don't numerically have the numbers NOR genetics. (zero negative birth rates coupled with the highest suicide rates) to be able to pull this off so they NEED & MUST have proxies and shills who represent their interests. THIS is what we need to hammer home: We cannot afford to sit around trying to persuade whites to commit genetic suicide (no global apartheid, no white people. period)..& instead have to decide if WE approve of & agree to continue to sustain a system that AT IT'S core, must get rid of our DNA to promote THEIR DNA. If you are ok with that..carry on, black people. If you want to play Jesus, the modern day martyr & die for white people's many, many sins–then YOU go right on ahead…ME, though, I didn't sign up for that shit and will fight to the death for our God-given RIGHT to exist on this damn planet–AUTONOMOUSLY. Sorry to go on a rant, but I get tired of hearing this same psycho babble fed to us & most of us, lapping it up like nectar. And also I want to add a link to those who think I'm over-stating how vile and sick this society is: This is a link to a video about how the CIA used Jim Jones & the People's Temple to covertly use mind control experiment on black people. AND I MAY ADD THIS CONTINUES TODAY–IN HOMELESS SHELTERS, in mental wards, in veteran's & public hospitals ACROSS THIS COUNTRY. Just b/c we don't want to admit we are dealing with Satan in the flesh, doesn't mean he ain't busy as hell: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IJzlILKzzZE#t=4910

  7. Jay Contreras Hey, I understand what you are saying. I was just listening to Dr. Cewss-Welshing on youtube, and she spoke about how blacks just flat out refuse to stand up to the abuses we suffer, from racism, she said blacks are not willing to put racist in check when they go around here practically in our face talking racist nonsense. Something else she said really important, she spoke about Eric Holder, which I have already cased him out, and I do NOT believe he is anything like Obama, and Dr. Cress made mention of Holder saying that time that Americans are a bunch of cowards and that it was language directed at blacks refusing to attack racism when it presents it ugly head. Another thing, I believe the reason Holder quit, is because of US vs Blewett, which I explained in my earlier post. It was going to be his office that will be going to fight against US vs Blewett. Google the Guardian, and Blewett, there is more detailed information about what Obama is fighting. Obama need to be put on the carpet about this, it is a serious matter, blacks need to get involved in this matter, this will clearly show Obama's true self and how he feels about blacks, and all the black men in prison illegally for drug offenses, he is fighting to keep thousands and thousands of blacks in prison. I say, he is working for the prison industrial complex, they need the bodies in prison, every last one has a value on their head.

  8. Jay Contreras says:

    Nzingha Shabaka I will look up the case. Not familiar with it but I'm always willing to admit if I'm wrong. What you say about Holder may be true & could be the reason he quit but I'm generally of the view that those given an inside track in 'massa's' house, are those who have been thoroughly vetted and deemed 'safe'. People like me ain't gettin' nowhere NEAR the big house. lol..and I'm ok with that. If anything I'll get slave patrollers put on me but again, that's just my belief but thanks, I will look up the case you mentioned.

  9. Jay Contreras says:

    Nzingha Shabaka Ok, I looked up that case & I am familiar with the sentencing disparities, although I wasn't familiar with that specific case. But I will say this: This is about a system & Obama & Holder are simply representing that system. By
    God, Obama was a constitutional law professor, so he KNOWS exactly what he's doing. The fact that he refused to allow redress for those who sit rotting in prison b/c of crack-cocaine sentencing disparities,says more than I could ever say. He didn't just refuse to allow them legal redress; he actively pushed policies to KEEP THEM BEHIND BARS without reconsideration of their sentences. But his actions don't exist in a vacuum. Look at cases across the country, like the Central Park 5 & the many black political prisoners who sit in prison, many for almost HALF A CENTURY, as targets of the FBI's illegal COINTELPRO program. The Central Park 5 had to fight tooth & nail for compensation EVEN AFTER it was proven that they were illegally & wrongly coerced into giving false confessions by cops. Not ONE cop or 'crime' enforcement officer of the court was punished. You basically have criminals enforcing' laws in this country. The same thing can be said for those sitting in prison for trumped up FBI COINTELPRO charges. There is 1 case (Ed Poindexter & Mondo We Langa of Nebraska) that is so apparently amoral and unjust & these brothas
    have been sitting in prison for over 44 years & it's so apparent that they were framed by CoINTELPRO. But they are not alone. Again, the SYSTEM is rotten to the core and like CHATTEL slavery before it, it is PROFIT-driven and feeds on the peddling of black bodies and free to low-cost black labor. THAT'S WHY ALL OF THIS IS ALLOWED TO CONTINUE. A LOT of people are making LOADS of money off of us. So Obama's actions in US vs. Bluvett don't surprise me & this is not about lack of power or sabotage by the repugs as his apologists would have you believe: He also didn't have any problem signing the NDAA into law. And he sure as hell didn't have any problem leaving Gitmo open & continuing the illegal detainment & imprisonment of those without ANY proof of guilt or even ANY charges filed against those held indefinitely. This is what black people are now supporting? Well, then if you are supporting THAT for 'others' then don't feign surprise when that kind of injustice shows up at your doorstep. Especially black people. WE SHOULD KNOW
    better. Whites may be lulled into a false sense of security after centuries of coddling–but eventually the same can be said for them too. But US? We have NO excuse for seemingly forgetting what we are dealing with. NONE.For me it's
    simple: the current prison industrial complex is just another reincarnation of a system that has profited historically from of our contained/restrained black bodies, misery & free to low-cost labor. We were brought here to build up & create white wealth & by Satan,that's what we will be used for. And it doesn't matter whether the head 'warden' in charge of this open air prison (not much different than the one in Gaza) is black,brown or white–the system churns on. I personally think unjust laws are the equivalent to NO laws but until black people are pushed far enough back into a corner where we react like we did during the 50's & 60's, then I guess we'll continue to be distracted by American Idol & Dancing with the Stars.

Leave a Reply

Back to top