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Sunday, October 26th, 2014

Samuel Jackson Challenges Reporter to Use the N-Word

Leave it to Samuel L. Jackson to make a white reporter squirm in his seat.

During an interview with television reporter Jake Hamilton of Houston’s Fox affiliate, Jackson said he wouldn’t answer any questions about his use of the N-word in the new Quentin Tarantino vehicle, “Django Unchained,” unless Hamilton said the N-word.

“There has been a lot of controversy surrounding the usage of the N-word in this movie,” Hamilton said to Jackson.

“No. Nobody. None,” Jackson interrupted, clearly relishing the moment. “The word would be?…”

Jackson then gave Hamilton and ultimatum.

“We’re not going to have this conversation unless you say it,” Jackson told Hamilton.

“I don’t want to say it,” Hamilton responded.

Jackson even asked Hamilton if he’d ever said it.

“No,” Hamilton said.

“Try it!” Jackson implored him, enjoying himself a little too much.

Hamilton then asked Jackson if he would say the word.

“No, f— no,” Jackson said.

Hamilton finally gave up, but added that it was a great question. To which Jackson responded, “it wasn’t a great question if you can’t say the word.”

While critics have questioned the frequency of the use of the word in the film, Tarantino and the film’s other African-American stars, Jamie Foxx and Kerry Washington, have defended it, saying it was appropriate to the time. Spike Lee said he’s boycotting the movie because it’s an insult to his ancestors.

“American Slavery Was Not A Sergio Leone Spaghetti Western. It Was A Holocaust. My Ancestors Are Slaves. Stolen From Africa. I Will Honor Them,” Lee tweeted.

But the film has mostly gotten rave reviews, from film critics and from African-American film-goers alike. Jackson has been singled out for praise for his portrayal of the monstrous house slave who wields his power like a brutal hammer over the other slaves on the plantation owned by Leonardo DiCaprio’s character. Many have wondered whether a supporting actor Academy Award nomination might be in Jackson’s future for forever recasting the image of the house slave.

About Nick Chiles

Nick Chiles is a Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist and New York Times bestselling author. He has written or co-written 12 books and won over a dozen major journalism awards during a journalism career that brought him to the Dallas Morning News, the Star-Ledger of New Jersey and New York Newsday, in addition to serving as Editor-in-Chief of Odyssey Couleur travel magazine.

Comments

  1. A Spike Lee espionage spy implant! Just when you thought it was safe to say "vipers , cretin, and serpents" Bro Samuel Jackson says 'don't be scared". A Bro West and Smiley duo…with a taste of – may he rest in peace – Rodney King.
    ~Terry

  2. ATTENTION: YES I KNOW I'M BLACK, SO I CAN USE THE WORD ANY WAY, ANYWHERE I PLEASE. I AM AWARE OF THE HISTORY, I STILL CHOOSE TO USE IT AS PART OF MY LINGO. IF U DON'T LIKE THE WORD, PROBABLY CUZ U DON'T UNDERSTAND IT…#IHONESTLYDON'TCARE.

    • I think the original point of using the word profusely was to defuse the word as a whole. Hell you got little white kids going around saying "nigga" but if you replace the "A" at the end with "ER" then you'll even see these kids reply "you don't say that." But, I digress, as a White Zionist, Jew Bashing, Slave Trading, Pokemon card collecting mogul of the ancient Chinese art of kung pao. I too smell the roses.

    • Just like I got yelled at by teenagers for calling this 20 something fool, a retard. Or fag, whoa do they get mad at that one. As a teen it was a pretty useful word when speaking to another male you didn't get along with… period.

  3. Michael Anthony Castelle Sr says:

    I believe any time you reference a individual by anything other than their name is casual conversation you are wrong. Its not how you feel about what you said; it how the person being directed by your workds feel about it. Until the miss educated understands that premise the issue will never go away. However, everyone is entitle to their opinions.

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