Meek Mill Takes Judge Who Sentenced Him to Task on New Track

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Meek Mill’s new album “Championships” was released last week to lots of fanfare but as fans began listening to the 19-track album, they piqued over the lyrics about the judge.

Track 2, “Trauma,” references his issues with Judge Genece Brinkley, the woman who handed down the sentence last year in Meek’s probation case relating to a 2008 weapon and drug charge.

Meek Mill
(Photo by Johnny Nunez/WireImage)

“Watching a Black woman take my freedom / Almost made me hate my people…” the Philadelphia rapper spits. Then he says “Judge bangin’ that gavel/ turned me to slave from a king.

Brinkley had sentenced Meek to serve two to four years in prison over the probation violation. Since last November, the MC’s attorneys had worked diligently to have Brinkley removed from the case, alleging she has a “personal vendetta” against Meek.

After the court denied the request for the judge’s removal, the rapper was ultimately released from prison in April on the order of the Philadelphia Supreme Court. He had spent almost five months in a state prison.

Fans chimed in on the lyrics.

“When @MeekMill said Judge bangin’ that gavel, turned me to slave from a king, I felt that.”

“The judge really pised of Meek Mill!”

“@MeekMill did ‘watching a black woman almost take my freedom’ really make you ‘almost hate my ppl’? pretty broad statement considering all the black women who support you #AskMeek⁠.”

“I hope the judge heard this albulm.”

“I see someone on LSA tweet a Meek Mill lyric about a black woman taking his freedom and it almost made him hate his people 🧐. He must be trying to get the twitter feminists to drag him for more buzz & thinkpieces….”

“I f—s with @MeekMill but this a black woman caused me to go to jail narrative can be missed by me.”

Aside from music, the rapper has focused his efforts on prison reform. He announced in May that he’d be teaming with the co-owner of the Philadelphia 76ers, Michael Rubin, to start a foundation tackling improving conditions in prisons.

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