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102 thoughts on “Comedian Trevor Noah Disappointingly Takes Shot at Black Americans’ Claim to Africa

  1. Numa Yurbiz says:

    He's so ignorant and biased against AFRICANS born in America. Doesn't matter if the African was born in America, Haiti, Bahamas, etc., we are all African. A lot more African than him since he's half white.

  2. where in the hell did he think we came from on those ships a– hole most african americans know more about africa and its history ,that the africans themselves , they don't even no that they're about to be colonized again ,starting with china, or the original name of the continent ,

  3. Tina Green says:

    He probably speaks from the point of view of those who view the US from the outside, not understanding that we want to both acknowledge our originating heritage as well as our citizenship. 2 to 3 decades ago, African American was meant to replace "Black", to get away from the connotation it bore with the civil rights movement – black vs white. Much to be learned here…

  4. Isnt he a half breed to begin with. Nothing he says is important

  5. He's right. The world does not revolve around people in the USA. People in Africa are not sitting around waiting for African-Americans to "come home". They have their own ish to do.

  6. What he says is dumb, but your comment about half breeds shows that you are also an idiot

  7. Sorry to say, but your response makes you sound ignorant too. Don’t start attacking all Africans because of what Trevor Noah said. He does not speak for Africans. Africans like me recognized that African Americans came from Africa. I dream of the day that many African Americans would return to Africa. These are our relatives, a reunion is needed.

  8. Not mad at the brother. Make your money Noah. I claim the native land that caused me to be melanin rich because it is more a part of me than the land my Ancestors worked here. I lay claim to both by natural right, not by choice. Peace, love and light.

  9. Vince Black says:

    The boy is sucking up to priveleged "progressives" (who are undercover racists, not hater racists, but, elitist racists). Tribalism and self hate in his little talk here…

  10. Nat Irvin II says:

    Intelligent commentary — his view his history his perspective and it's funny

  11. Just because a kitten is born in an oven does not make it a loaf of bread. He just trying to sell jookes for dollars.

  12. It's complicated. I spent time in Africa, and I realized that I'm really a Black American. This is not to discount my ancestors or the connection I as a Black person have to Africa. It is instead an acknowledgment of the Black experience in America; all of it.

  13. interesting perspective. i never got the impression that people of African descent in America believe Africans from the continent owe them anything. whether or not we make our pilgrimage back home (to the continent), we just want to be recognized simply as people of African linage & heritage. we are American by circumstance not by choice. our ancestors did not come here willingly. not saying this is the thought process of most Africans i have encountered but, sometimes i believe Africans that come to the states believe we left Africa voluntarily & that slavery never existed-it is just a figment of our imagination. by the way, most of us claim the entire continent because we don't know which country our ancestors came from. i am the exception. i took a DNA test & discovered i am a descendant of the Bamileke people of Cameroon.

  14. Kaylin Linda says:

    Africans born in America?! That would make them American. I was born in America and my ancestors may have been born in Africa, but that doesn't make me African. We are not all African.

  15. The thing is Timothy Hamilton that most of us across the diaspora don't know EXACTLY where we came from but if you study the trade routes and analyse the numbers taken it's safe to presume that most of us are from west and central Africa. Many Africans don't know the history of enslavement (don't forget whilst Europeans were doing a number on us they were also colonising the continent and sewing the seeds of misinformation and discontent there as well!) I've heard horror stories from Nigerian friends who have said they were taught that the people who were taken were wicked and bad and that's why they had to go! Honestly theres a lot of misinformation about not just in America so it's not really surprising that the Africans you have encountered didn't know anything about slavery. We have a hell of a lot of work to do ACROSS the diaspora not just in the US. What really needs to happen is that most black Americans need to go to the continent and see what it's like and meet people and talk to locals. Africa is an amazing holiday destination and should be a place we all go to as often as possible, if for no other reason than to learn about each other. A friend of mine has a very unique perspective on the whole topic, he is Ghanaian raised in the UK amongst the Caribbean population, spent much time in the US met and married a black Canadian and is now living in Canada. He has written a book which is worth checking out if you care to, it's called The Secret Relationship Between Blacks and Africans http://www.amazon.co.uk/Secret-Relationship-between-Africans-Blacks/dp/1511614439

  16. Same here. I spent 6 years in South Africa (off and on) and even married an African man. Africa is not my home. I have no connection with the people there and even had a hard time understanding and trying to accept my husbands culture. I was called colored, asked "what am I" and wasn't recognzied as black by Africans. It was an eye opening experience but I'm glad I experienced it.

  17. Billy Tuggle says:

    Divided is how they want us. Doing a fine job here.
    #WakeUp

  18. Smid Ball says:

    Yo it`s comedy not a history lesson. The boy cant be that stupid to not know where we came from or how we got in different places LOL

  19. Teleica Evette wow! that is the first i've heard of the Nigerian story. that is truly disheartening and yes i do agree that all sides have to constructively engage each other. there are a lot of misconceptions and the school system in the US only perpetuates those misconceptions with a pro-European curriculum. however, there are a number of independent schools and organizations that are enlightening people with an African- centered approach. unfortunately, this is being done on a small scale. nonetheless, it is happening. also, there are many people of African descent in this country that are making the piligrimage. thanks for the reference. will check it out. i'd like to leave you with something, too. this is my theme song:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=95UyWWUdY6k

  20. Johnny Young says:

    Really dude. I don't think he is the one who is lost.

  21. Wow is he really this ignorant. I'm not wasting my money to see this guy anytime soon. What a fool!!!

  22. why are yall mad at hime doe?????…. it is a comedy and he talks shit about everyone so why don't yall just take it as a comedy and a joke and keep it moving…

  23. Ayson Baxter says:

    For everyone getting buthurt over this the important point went right over your heads! Why say someone is african american, asian american, latino american, yet the white man is just plain and simply "american" and not european american? Does it make more sense to you now? He's not saying he doesn't have african roots, he's saying why is the prefix so important for one group but not as much for another.

  24. Lol, folks just mad he's way smarter than they expected "his type" to be.. the ripples of a rude awakening! Trevor's obviously not knocking down on anyone's conscience, he's simply shading light from an external, objective view on issues that subjects caught up within the phenomena wouldn't naturally see it that way.

    And obviously with a sprinkle of humor to signify the subtlety at with he presents his intellectual observation. Time to get out of the box and for once, begin to study the core of what really makes your society what it is today.. makes life a whole lot easier thereon in.

  25. Lol, folks just mad he's way smarter than they expected "his type" to be.. the ripples of a rude awakening! Trevors' obviously not knocking down on anyone's social conscience, he's simply shading light from an external, objective view on issues that the subjects currently caught up within the phenomena wouldn't naturally see it that way.

    And obviously with a sprinkle of humor to signify the subtlety at which he presents his intellectual observation. Time to get out the box and for once, begin to study and understand the core of what really makes your society what it is today.. makes life a whole lot easier thereon in.

  26. It's comedy and he is on point loosen up folk.

  27. Jeez, I read the comments before watching the clip and thought the clip was gonna be waaay worse based on the comments. Trevor is an intelligent person (mixed race or not) and he absolutely has a strong grasp on where black Americans have come from, but seriously, and I mean no offence by this but some black Americans do need to get over themselves a bit. He's not wrong, no one is waiting for you, there are over a billion people on the continent and most are concerned with getting on with their daily lives and growing their families as anyone else would be!
    Some black Americans have a romanticised view of Africa and go on like Africa is just there for them wating to scoop them up and embrace them and I'm afraid this really isn't the case. Sure ther are groups in countries (especially in the west) who will welcome the diaspora (because many of our ancestors in different countries experienced slavery not just African Americans!) with open arms, but you're not gonna be waited on hand and foot you better be prepared to work…hard!

    I realise the majority of black Americans may not behave like this but everytime I've been to the continent and come across black Americans they behave as if Africans owe them something, they behave as if the people in whatever country I happen to be in should treat them like royalty and that is impractical and unrealistic and quite disrespectful. Of course you are long lost family and you are welcome back but firstly no one is your servant, if these are your kinfolk be respectful and mindful of what they may or may not understand about your existence in the US; many Africans I've encountered don't see Africa as romantically as black Americans do or understand the struggles of the black American in the US. Secondly take time, Africa is a massive continent with 54 countries everywhere and every region is not yours for claiming, and thirdly recognise that other black people from other parts of the diaspora may also be doing their journey of rediscovery, try not to bulldose it! Just my tuppence worth!

  28. Kaylin Linda says:

    Elsa T Belachew I'm not really sure what you're trying to say, but I am Black and not African. I wasn't born there and as much as I would love to go, I have never been there.

  29. That in one embarressingly ignorant descendant of Africa. I thought he was going in on the fact that we have Nationalities stolen from us and labeled back as "Africans", "Negroes", "Coloreds", etc. Instead he outright dissed ALL descendants of Africa here in the West. Shameful, plus ignorant.

  30. this so they can get web traffic off of yoll dumb asses

  31. I thik you are all missing the point ! I think he is tryin to remind people that not all dark skinned people are from Africa ! The reason that Ayson is talking about did not come from the white man, it came from black people who did not want to be called black, but thought African American sounded better! It was as a so called Politically correct term! That in itself should tell us all something ! Who cares, we are all American !! Why does black or white sound better or worse than just American ! All black people do not have African roots. That is what he is saying !

    I’m Black but not African American

    219 Comments

    Carl Yard
    Hamden, CT
    I think the term African American was self serving for Black Americans .They obviously did not consider people like me who are black and from the Caribbean or Black people from other countries.How about white people living in America but are from South Africa.They to would be considered African American.I prefer not to be referred to as African American because it omits my Caribbean heritage.I resent that and so do many others.

  32. Were you born in Africa ? If not you are the one with the issue. Most white Americans don't go around saying "I am Sottish American or I am English American " ( because of our ancestors) This is the problem with race in this country!! Why can we not all just be Americans if we are born in America and forget all the other terms?

  33. So-called "African-Americans", or USA "blacks", "negros" are ACTUALLY more American than African, AND more NATIVE than the so-called "Native American". The numbers don't lie. Only 5% of the Atlantic Slave Trade involved the U.S., and of that 5% only a third were women AND children. Of the portion OF that third that were women, next to NONE OF THEM would have been physically able after such a harrowing, violent, and literally sickening journey to conceive, let alone bear millions of slave children. Their reproductive system would've been out of whack. Some did, YES. BUT, what the U.S. ACTUALLY did to carry out their slave operation was to BREED — NOT to ship, ship, and ship more. THAT is what the REST of the America's did for their OWN operation. The U.S. bred the shipped 2/3rds of Africans (the men) with the "black"/dark-skinned NATIVE WOMEN that were already here (thousands of years before Columbus). At BEST we are 50/50 — that is to say, just as much African as we are Native Indigenous Americans. BUT, looked at in terms of "you are whatever your MOTHER was/is" — as in mitochondrial DNA — we are most certainly most likely (according to the odds and the math) NATIVE INDIGENOUS AMERICANS. Simply put, MILLLLLLLLLIONS of Africans were shipped to the Americas, and of those millions, only 300,000 of them came to the U.S. That's it. Must watch. Must listen. American Deception: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Og8jaZsZJdE

  34. Israel Jones says:

    No, he's more african than you, he's actually born here.

  35. my ancestors help white man capture my ppl 4 slavery thats not home we have no home down here until we return back 2 him that made us.reseach ur history and u will see

  36. he is mulatto so that means he is already lost lolololololololollollololollo

  37. Jeff Gavin says:

    What exactly was "disappointing" about this?

  38. The man is telling jokes dude.

  39. Kaylin Linda well the masters calling yall… you are BLACK and Afrikan so why not just love self be proud……thats why Afrikan don't give a—- about black american because the black american hate self and whant be everyone but proud mama Afrikan lol

  40. Johnny Young says:

    Wynston Godfavorsme Clemens Perhaps a reunion can occur without us physically being on the same continent. No one "needs" the other. But…we can recognize our roots from Africa, while Africans can recongize that we are a part of them. And we can each appreciate and bond with each other in ways that strengthen both groups. To add something to the discussion, was the message that Noah was sending even singularly directed at blacks? We aren't generally the ones putting us in the little boxes that people try to put others in. But…we have argued over Negro vs Black vs African American.

  41. Johnny Young says:

    Exactly. And the comments about him and his looks, and how "black" he is, speaks more about those making those comments. And it actually backs up some of what he's bringing to light in this comedic effort. But sometimes we are our own worst enemy and reinforce what "they" say about us. Black is black….1% or 100%. None of us picked our parents, our ancestors or our first home. So to look at someone differently because of that, is no different than the racists who attack us. Look deeper people.

  42. Roy Simmons says:

    Africa. Would the term be realtive to the continent? In saying American there is North ,Central and, South.

  43. I think you are confusing ethnicity with nationality

  44. Israel Jones shut up he's half cave man he will never be more African than a full black American.

  45. Omar Easley says:

    This is nothing to get mad about…….here, try this…..

  46. Patty Atwan says:

    Very well stated.

  47. Patty Atwan says:

    Kaylin Linda Thank you. I have never figured out why everyone puts something in front of American. Every citizen is an American. My grandfather didn't say he was Italian-American or my grandmother Irish-American. Once they received their citizenships they were proud to say they were American Citizens. For the United States to stay strong we must work together as the Citizens of The United States. As the saying goes "United we stand – Divided we fall". I pray we can work and live in peace.

  48. Patty Atwan Your ancestors were White and saw it advantageous to be seen as White in a society that discriminated heavily against Irish and Italian people. Black people cannot "blend". Furthermore, I grew up in the Bronx and know plenty of people who call themselves Irish-American, Italian-American, Albanian-American etc. None of us should police what people choose to call themselves. White people say Caucasian all the time even though they're not from the Caucusus Mountains. Doesn't bother me. What people choose to call themselves has nothing to do with "unity".

  49. Ayson Baxter says:

    The article's headline is also very misleading. Obviously structured to create this reaction

  50. I can't say that I am from African, I've never been to the Africa and I'm not from their. I still classify myself as such because I would like to have meaningful relationships with my people and trace my lineage. I may not be from Africa but I can go back a few generations and find my descendants that are from Africa. At this point, I'd venture that I have origins from several countries within the continent. Before slavery & racism, black people were too tribal and warred with each other over nothing. In the context of now, I have to say that we need to just understand that we are all one. The prefix is important to me because it symbolizes where I should have been from. Maybe some people don't care about their history or roots due to materialism but I want to be one with my people and lift them up. I know someone is going to pop up with the "You're American, lift up Americans" or "Why don't you go back to Africa if you miss it so much?" First off, can't go back to a place you've never been (kind of rudimentary information). Next, I lift up who I want to in my life. Perception is everything and most of the negative interactions I've had with my people were when I was a kid to my late teens and it wasn't anything dramatic or horrendous. I'm that black guy that other black people try to use as an example. I'm the guy who has had people shout 'white power' and had people try to attack me in a club/bar or make threats of violence with vehicles. I'm the guy who has been pulled over by cops who literally had to make up excuses as to why on several occasions. In my life, black people haven't been perfect but the potential is there when we know the right way to go about things. I'm a firm proponent of responsibility and taking care of ourselves but I'm also a believer that the internet gives people the ability to spew hate and expect others to be fine with it. Don't believe me, go on Yahoo and check the black news comments. As soon as some black guy does something, 'niggers' need to be killed off or exterminated (easier said than done in my case). Have any of you ever noticed that black/African lineage is suppressed when a black person does anything good ("They're not black, they're American) but the whole race is criminals when a few people get stupid. Somehow, I'm supposed to be cool with this and keep it moving. Think I'm being sensitive, who gives a f***? I'm expressing why I support my people and why I use the African portion of the title. Am I going to hate on all non-black people? No, that wouldn't be fair but let's not pretend like America is the greatest thing in the history of time when you can be declined for a job because your name isn't simple like Peter or Thomas. I will never drop the African portion of ethnicity. Noah may be from Africa but that doesn't phase me, his opinions don't reflect what mine are and he has no say over anything that occurs in my world.

  51. Al Williams says:

    Fuck Trevor Noah, he's just one of these mullato coons that wants every black man to subscribe to his much cherished European side. Negroes like this will always embolden the other coons to start up with that bullshit about “we’re not from Africa, we’re just Americans!” I’m sure dropping “African” will keep the police off your asses in the future.

    Look, I know I was born in the USA, I know that I am American, but the title “African American” refers to the origins of my race, something I happen to be proud of. If you want to go on believing your ancestors originated in North America, that’s your business, shut the fuck and leave the block blank when it calls for a response.

  52. Ayson Baxter obviously too many of us don't know our history either. We ARE in fact NATIVES to this land and can be considered, just as the Asians who crossed the Bering Straits to get here, as ORGINAL Americans. Why? Because we were here FIRST. You'd think in 2016 more Negoes knew that.

  53. Patty Atwan Did you say he was well spoken or he had a good point…? Just sayin…thin line there. haha

  54. Al Rilley says:

    We must learn to laugh more. What I find fun may not be to you. There is this thing, well you can't say this you can't say that with out some one getting panties in a knot. Comedians are people make fun of our realilty. It's getting harder each time when people fush to say you ain't with us. Well 1st we are all bone here Americans. I always use other if I can. I'm or mix origin, and I believe most so call Africana Americans are some that to. I'm not Black in color are you, hey when is the last time you seen a white peson in color. Tags we put for things like racism we have of color, former slaves offspring felt and identity problem for many years we did not like being called colored well in reality we are. and so is everyone else

  55. Elsa T Belachew What does "yall" means?I'm not familiar with that word,is it African?Or is it just a proof of your ignorance and stupidity?

  56. He's doing this cause the ratings are tanking for his show

  57. We all are Descendents of AFRIKA! That's it that's all! KNEEGROWS be tripping because they don't want to have any part of AFRIKA! Now that's SELFHATE at its finest.I am an AFRIKAN living in RACIST AZZ AMERIKKKA!!!! Which is also my/our Home because we were here first. You better do your homework research? AFRIKA is in my DNA!!!!! And that halfbreed is a mistake. His forefathers went over there and took over our Land there to. We where here before anyone the Black Man. RESEARCH? [email protected] Uuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuu AND YES U

  58. Mark Herrick says:

    Well Ayson, when Europe threw out their trash, they weren't allowed to call themselves European anymore.
    🙂

  59. Numa Yurbiz I think you're mistaken. Trevor is not reputing the fact that there are African Americans. what he's reputing is the prefix used to describe the races found in America. Since America is a place where most people from different countries immigrate to, and all these other races are named using a Prefix to kinda discribe there background but the most white people from America are just called Americans and they are not pin pointed with a prefix. I think that's what he was talking about. Not to diss African Americans in a way that he doesn't recognise them. plus It's true. not every black person who is black in America is African American. Some are from Jamaica as he pointed out, Some are from Haiti and Some are from the Bahamas but Not from Africa.

  60. Becky Grey says:

    OMG, this comdey rshow has been out for over a year.

  61. Jessika Shujaa Blanco well he was born there and had it worse because his father was white his mother couldn't be show love in public he knows more about south Africa than you

  62. False. I've never met an Irish American not tell me he's Irish, or an Italian American, same goes for Chinese, or Korean, or Japanese,or Indian. You ever heard a pueto Rican say theyre just American? Nope. Nothing wrong with with being proud of ones heritage…UNLESS of course they're African American. Stop being dumb, that's exactly what THEY want SMH

  63. Amlak Nigus says:

    I watched the clip and he doesn't seem to be taking shots at Afrikan americans claims to Afrika just how prefixes are attached in amerikkka and this is coming from an ACa (Afrikan Carribeian american) , So Nice deceptive headline smh

  64. Ross Brown says:

    White people the ones that gave us the term African American. We were took from Africa.

  65. Ayson Baxter This is why I don't like the badly researched misleading headlines and articles that people share from this publication.

  66. Israel Jones says:

    William Weeden Ofc he does, he was born in South Africa lol.

  67. If you are mad at this joke then you missed the entire point of his commentary.

  68. Teleica Evette I agree with you. My Grandparents came to the UK in 50s from Jamaica and my Grandparents always made a point of making us know that we are Africans. Some Jamaicans do try to distance themselves from that, which is so sad as it is so evident in the Jamaican culture. As you may know, the African diaspora in the UK is called Afro Caribbean. People need to wake up and see, it is self explanatory, African first as that is where we all originate, everything else is just to cause confusion.

  69. Tox Adeniji says:

    Jeanine Horton & Carter Paige, i am assuming you went to the "wrong side" figuratively speaking. I am a Nigerian and if per chance i went to East Africa, i would probably feel i disconnected from the people because of the different orientation and cultures we have but would be more than feel at home if i were to visit countries in West Africa. My point being that it all depends on what part of Africa you visited before you came to your general sweeping conclusions. Just so you know, there are 54 DIFFERENT countries in Africa with different cultures and orientations of which one country Nigeria has over 250 different languages/dialects and definitely different orientation, cultures and traditions. With all due respect, I think you both need to learn more about MOTHER AFRICA.

  70. Israel Jones says:

    Mduduzi Dlamini I do love when my fellow countrymen get real.

  71. We should see ourselves as part of a global community.

    Maybe like he said, Africans are not waiting for us. But just look at how chineese cope with that kind of situation : Even if this country is getting stronger, it never forgets its overseas progeny … That's the way a strong worldwide community operates, in a well built socio-economic framework.

    Of course we cannot already compare Africa with China, but im speaking in a panafrican context.

    *Sorry for my bad english i'm from europe.

  72. Nzinga Mack says:

    Here is an interview that he did on NPR with Terry Gross about the above routine:

    GROSS: That's Trevor Noah in 2013. So what is…

    NOAH: Here…

    GROSS: Yeah.

    NOAH: So when I first got to the United States, I mean, this was something I always joked about and joked within was the longing of African-Americans to return to a place they considered home, which was Africa, the motherland. And I always joked about it because as an African, you're going, we're so far apart, we're so different, that this is not your home. This is not – you know? No one's waiting for you here. No one is thinking of it like that. And it was a joke that I played around in because I had no idea how excluded African-Americans feel in America. And that's why I say comedy's all about context because two things happened to me. One, I realized that there was a pain and a pride that was attached to that statement of the motherland, which I took for granted because I'm from the motherland. And the second thing was – and this was probably one of the most painful things. And you can't control this all the time in comedy but you try to. And that was I will never forget the day – there was a white middle-aged man. And he heard that joke. And he laughed, but he laughed in such a mean way. And he laughed and he said, I love it. He said, I love it, Trevor, you know? You know what I love about this is that you showed them that they're not real black people. They, you know, they act like they're suffering, but you can show them. You can tell them what the real black is about 'cause you're from Africa. And you can tell them. And it was the weirdest feeling because I realized in that moment, he had used what I intended to be playful teasing, and he had used it as a weapon. In his world, he was going, I've found something I can use to oppress those who are already oppressed. Like, I found something I can use to hurt people even more.

    GROSS: And feel justified in doing it because it's coming out of the mouth…

    NOAH: Exactly.

    GROSS: …Of a black man.

    NOAH: Exactly. And once that happens, that's something that no comedian really wants. I mean, I – it's funny 'cause Dave Chappelle is a friend of mine, and we talked about that. And he told me stories of how that broke his heart as well when people, you know, felt that they could run around saying the N-word because he said it and they were like, no, no, I'm just saying Dave Chappelle's joke. I'm not saying – you know? And he was like, I'm not giving – this is not – it wasn't supposed to be a license for you to go out and hurt other people using me as an excuse. It was me expressing myself for my audience. And so that was something that I came to realize is that you have to be careful. You don't have full control over it. But you have to be careful because what you may create as something designed to be harmless, could be used by someone else to be harmful.

    GROSS: So does that mean that you wouldn't do that comedy bit that we just played?

    NOAH: No…

    GROSS: You wouldn't do it anymore?

    NOAH: …It doesn't mean I wouldn't do it. But if I did it, I would do it in a way now that I make sure that I don't allow anybody to steal it from me. That's the key thing is not allowing anyone to hijack your message and use it…

    GROSS: How do you do that?

    NOAH: Well, it's just about – it's funny. It's like people do with the Constitution. It's just – it's about amending it, that's all it is. I amend my comedy. I go, this is open to interpretation. This might be confusing and this might get people fighting unnecessarily. So let me amend my joke so that it is less confusing so they see where I'm coming from and what my intention is. And that's literally all I do. So if you realize something is vague, you have an opportunity to go in and amend it to impart more clarity.

    GROSS: Did you amend that routine?

    NOAH: I haven't – no, I haven't done – because it's such an old routine, I haven't done it.

    GROSS: Right, OK.

    NOAH: So, you know? So I haven't needed to go back. But I have amended many routines just because I've learned. You know, sometimes someone will go, hey, that actually means this here or that touches on a different thing in this country. And then I go, oh, and I amend it. I'm never afraid to admit that I'm wrong.

    GROSS: Well, Trevor Noah, thank you so much for talking with us. I wish you good luck with "The Daily Show." I've been enjoying it very much. Thank you so much.

    NOAH: Thank you very much.

    I can always appreciate someone who does better when they know better. The entire audio and transcript can be found on NPR.org

  73. Nzinga Mack says:

    Here is an interview that Trevor Noah did on NPR with Terry Gross about the above routine:

    GROSS: That's Trevor Noah in 2013. So what is…

    NOAH: Here…

    GROSS: Yeah.

    NOAH: So when I first got to the United States, I mean, this was something I always joked about and joked within was the longing of African-Americans to return to a place they considered home, which was Africa, the motherland. And I always joked about it because as an African, you're going, we're so far apart, we're so different, that this is not your home. This is not – you know? No one's waiting for you here. No one is thinking of it like that. And it was a joke that I played around in because I had no idea how excluded African-Americans feel in America. And that's why I say comedy's all about context because two things happened to me. One, I realized that there was a pain and a pride that was attached to that statement of the motherland, which I took for granted because I'm from the motherland. And the second thing was – and this was probably one of the most painful things. And you can't control this all the time in comedy but you try to. And that was I will never forget the day – there was a white middle-aged man. And he heard that joke. And he laughed, but he laughed in such a mean way. And he laughed and he said, I love it. He said, I love it, Trevor, you know? You know what I love about this is that you showed them that they're not real black people. They, you know, they act like they're suffering, but you can show them. You can tell them what the real black is about 'cause you're from Africa. And you can tell them. And it was the weirdest feeling because I realized in that moment, he had used what I intended to be playful teasing, and he had used it as a weapon. In his world, he was going, I've found something I can use to oppress those who are already oppressed. Like, I found something I can use to hurt people even more.

    GROSS: And feel justified in doing it because it's coming out of the mouth…

    NOAH: Exactly.

    GROSS: …Of a black man.

    NOAH: Exactly. And once that happens, that's something that no comedian really wants. I mean, I – it's funny 'cause Dave Chappelle is a friend of mine, and we talked about that. And he told me stories of how that broke his heart as well when people, you know, felt that they could run around saying the N-word because he said it and they were like, no, no, I'm just saying Dave Chappelle's joke. I'm not saying – you know? And he was like, I'm not giving – this is not – it wasn't supposed to be a license for you to go out and hurt other people using me as an excuse. It was me expressing myself for my audience. And so that was something that I came to realize is that you have to be careful. You don't have full control over it. But you have to be careful because what you may create as something designed to be harmless, could be used by someone else to be harmful.

    GROSS: So does that mean that you wouldn't do that comedy bit that we just played?

    NOAH: No…

    GROSS: You wouldn't do it anymore?

    NOAH: …It doesn't mean I wouldn't do it. But if I did it, I would do it in a way now that I make sure that I don't allow anybody to steal it from me. That's the key thing is not allowing anyone to hijack your message and use it…

    GROSS: How do you do that?

    NOAH: Well, it's just about – it's funny. It's like people do with the Constitution. It's just – it's about amending it, that's all it is. I amend my comedy. I go, this is open to interpretation. This might be confusing and this might get people fighting unnecessarily. So let me amend my joke so that it is less confusing so they see where I'm coming from and what my intention is. And that's literally all I do. So if you realize something is vague, you have an opportunity to go in and amend it to impart more clarity.

    GROSS: Did you amend that routine?

    NOAH: I haven't – no, I haven't done – because it's such an old routine, I haven't done it.

    GROSS: Right, OK.

    NOAH: So, you know? So I haven't needed to go back. But I have amended many routines just because I've learned. You know, sometimes someone will go, hey, that actually means this here or that touches on a different thing in this country. And then I go, oh, and I amend it. I'm never afraid to admit that I'm wrong.

    GROSS: Well, Trevor Noah, thank you so much for talking with us. I wish you good luck with "The Daily Show." I've been enjoying it very much. Thank you so much.

    NOAH: Thank you very much.

    I can always appreciate someone who does better when he knows better. The entire audio and transcript can be found on NPR.org

  74. Well the only thing I didn't like about this clip is his attempt on the Jamaican accent. I have also wondered the same. If it is that you are born in America, why is there a need to add the prefix. You are American, I can't prove it, but America is the only country I know that adds a racial prefix to differentiate nationality.

    I was born in Jamaica so that makes me Jamaican, and each Jamaican identifies with that as their nationality, whether they are red, yellow, black or white.

  75. My ancestors are from Ireland, but I wasn't born there. Am I an Irish American? I don't get it.

  76. He's explaining the ignorance that most of us have about the African Continent.

  77. I've listed to this 5 times and I did not hear him say anything like that

  78. Timothy Hamilton Yaaaaasssss Peter Tosh all day! I love that bloody song!!

  79. Timothy Hamilton Incidently Jamaica is one of the only countries in the Caribbean that has an institute dedicated to the understanding and learning of it's African History. Some Jamaicans may go on about not being African but I assure you most Jamaicans are fully aware of their African origins.

  80. He's absolutely right. Nothing wrong with what he said on the slightest.

  81. If a mother rabbit has babies in an oven, would that make the baby rabbits chickens? Nope. They're still rabbits.

  82. Cecelia Fedd says:

    He's so dumb, American is your citizenship

  83. Although well traveled, sadly I can not say that I have had any experiences from Africa, although I will. I am proud that my linage can be traced back to Africa. We are descendents of Original Man, First on Earth, made in God's Image. Anyone who is ashamed of that, or is so engulfed in materialism that being American is important and than acknowledging their African heritage, more's the pity. I don't need anyone from Africa to validate me. They've been colonized and diluted, too, so much in fact, that they are still regarded as a 3rd World Nation when they actually should be the 1st World Nation. So we all have some issues to work out on both sides of things….

  84. Ross Brown White people did not give us that designation. Google the origns of the when the term African American developed. It was in the late 80's. We did that to term ourselves. I personally, do not have a problem with it.

  85. I applaud any person of African descent who wants to connect with the so called mother land, Africa. If it were not for devilish Europeans kidnapping their ancestors, these people would have been born in Africa or at least more connected to it Trevor's remark was insensitive, for a watered down version of African; he's Africanness could be questioned as well. It wasn't funny nor thought provoking; he cannot or could not understand what people of African descent have gone through in this country of hyprocrisy democracy. He needs to focus on the many issues which plague the real Africans of SA after the unsucessful process of reconciliation. A funny thing in SA he would have been classified as colored not even African, so he really needs to be quiet about labels and identities.

  86. Tox Adeniji sorry brother, just trying to get everyone on the same page, the video is excellent , brother to brother , we need to communicate as one people

  87. Teleica Evette yes. Jamaicans tend to be a little more conscious about their African heritage than people of African descent here in the states. i dated a young lady from Jamaica & had an opportunity to visit the island. she and i had discussions about that topic on several occasions.

  88. you're right. that brief clip is miss leading and can be easily taken out of context. you have to watch the entire show to get the full impact of what he is saying.

  89. Keith Evans says:

    I don't understand the use of the term "disappointingly" in the title at all.

  90. its good to know where you come from, but Africans have many problems of their own. i dont get why folks yearn for this belonging with Africa. My personal encounters with real Africans havent been that great, neither my experiences with Jamicans. they talked down on my lifestyle and clture and the things we put up wit here, like they are not killing each other everyday also. i've been called a slave and cotton picker by non american blacks.

  91. Where did he take a shot at black people? the media sure knows how to take advantage of yall psyche and emotions with headlines!!

  92. Paul Andre Taylor errrmm, I'd dispute the "looking to us as leaders" thing Paul but OK if that's your experience then that's your experience, but don't let your ego run away with you African people from teh continent are incredibly proud, rightly so, and are deserving of respect just like the rest of us! The coonery and buffoonery however, yea there's a bag of work to do there!

  93. Marc Clarke says:

    I think he's hilarious..and this is not a new routine. I wasn't offended at all I love his point of view. When I went to SA I was talking to a Zulu and he said not to call him Brotha because his people didn't sell their people into slavery…it was a great moment for me as well as all the conversations I had with the black and colored South Africans with different points of view…

  94. Elsa T…….you are so right, that;s the way I took it. Nevertheless,it's sad but true no one is waiting for those persons who speak using those
    terms.

  95. Joy Foster says:

    Elsa T Belachew That's not the way a young lady from Africa told it to me (as an American). She stated that she does not identify as Black, but rather, African-Scottish-Irish (or whatever the last ethnicity/nationality was), and she was about the same skin tone as Idris Elba. "I" was the one who stated that I am "Black". Don't generalize.

  96. Joy Foster says:

    Paul Andre Taylor Um, no. Many STILL denounce us.

  97. Joy Foster says:

    Wow, 'expect to be waited on hand and foot'?? I ALREADY work hard for my living, with a full time AND a part time job. NO ONE does ANYTHING for me. I don't know you in person, and I know words online can sometimes not convey the true intent, but please know that your 'description' of us came across as a huge insult, and sounds much like the 'job' whites have done on us by calling us 'lazy' and putting that in every piece of media to warp the minds of everyone else around us.

  98. Joy Foster says:

    Wynston Godfavorsme Clemens Unfortunately, you seem to be in the minority. Most Africans I've spoken with have the same attitude, that WE are not 'cousins' across the pond, nor do they acknowledge our being sold out/stolen from what would have been our home. I want to visit, but for the beauty of the land. Maybe, see where the ships took off, but I don't want to have to deal with that type of treatment from people that look like me. I get enough of that here from the current majority and 'model' minorites.

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