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Cape Verdean Woman Explains Why Most People in Her Country Deny Being Black

Cape Verdean Woman Explains Why Most People in Her Country Den…

Cape Verdean Woman Explains Why Most People in Her Country Deny Being Black

Posted by Media Explosion on Saturday, April 16, 2016

via Facebook

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99 thoughts on “Cape Verdean Woman Explains Why Most People in Her Country Deny Being Black

  1. Proud to be African! Recognize…

  2. Wow! I Thought It Was Only The Dominicans Who Was Lost.. There's More Ethnicity Of People With African Blood That Deniying Their Roots.

  3. All ethnicities have African roots. All…..

  4. Well, why is the title say that she say "…Deny being black" but she is saying that her people ".. Should not deny being African", she never said her people are black. I guess it's something we still need to fight.

  5. Same difference, lol.

  6. We're all descendants of Africa!

  7. Gina Stevens says:

    She is so right. I've actually never met a Cape Verdean who denied their African roots, but some people have not taught to be proud of themselves. It's sad really. I'm happy she made this video.

  8. Gina Stevens says:

    I guess the person who came up with the title thought it would be better, but that in itself is ashame. SMH

  9. Pat Courtney says:

    That's her. She can think whatever she wants about her race. I was born in New England. If I go back, I'm Irish and before that, Norse and Celt, and before that Indo-European and before that African. Proud of all of them, but mostly New Englander.

  10. Marco Alves says:

    Everyone is mixed!!! My skin color might be white but my nationality is not!!! My nationality is Portuguese and proud of it!!!!

  11. I myself am Portuguese Cape Verdean native Indian i tell ppl all the time that that my roots are from Africa..beside the native Indian. .ppl need to do history and look into there heritage. .yea im light skin but im still African

  12. Kedar Ra says:

    CRACKERS AIn't FROM AFRICA THEY FROM HELL CAUSE THEY DEVILS FACTZ.

  13. Don't be like that, they are just misguided in this world. Most white people are quite pleasant. Don't stoop to their levels of discrimination, that's what makes us a better people!

  14. Kedar Ra says:

    Willie Tucker NO I WILL NOT DO THAT.

  15. Kedar Ra says:

    THEY R PERFECT EVIL.

  16. so why are you here? she said if your cape verdian be proud of it!!

  17. Alec Couto says:

    I am Capeverdian and African and I am proud, but girl in Cape Verde has no archaeological evidence has had native people had such Canary islands where I live now. Good video greetings. But it is only problem over there in US because capeverdians in Europe or Brasil are very proud about their roots. The biggest problem is that Americans do not know that Africa is a continent full of countries they believe that Africa is one country.

  18. Gina Stevens says:

    There's a good chance your existence is due to an African woman being raped by one of ones you seem to be more proud to be a part of it.

  19. You go girl you are a real one!

  20. Pat Courtney says:

    I doubt it, Gina. Maybe an Irish woman beg raped by a Viking, though. I'm first generation to North America. You've missed my point.

  21. Pat Courtney says:

    I doubt it, Gina. Maybe an Irish woman beg raped by a Viking, though. I'm first generation to North America. You've missed my point.

  22. Cortni Tyler says:

    I don't think Americans believe what you said lol

  23. Sophia Silva says:

    I am the young lady in the video. Follow my YouTube channel Sofies world. I will be posting more videos and hope you all can engage, have a laugh at times, and pass it on to your friends and family. Peace and blessings.

  24. Joli Santos says:

    Joli Santos

    I think this is something that has been instilled in some CV's minds for years. I agree with her, when your in CV u feel African not European. But I also think most of the new generation make the relative connection of being Cabo Verde is being Africana. I'm proud to be a Criola bc we are mulata,beautiful culture, and its a sweet mix, Africana n Portuguese. Just listen to the music, listen to those African drums, I love my culture, just can't deny our African roots. Jah Bless!

  25. Bioja Bebe says:

    She needs to use another source other than google before she starts ranting and raving about who Cape Verdeans are and how they perceive who they are. IDIOT

  26. Your way off in your analysis about Americans.

  27. Your way off in your analysis about Americans.

  28. Stupid ass cape dirtians you on the coast of Senegal, big respect to all my African people who was colonized by the Portuguese like Angola Africa come first. CV act like their better then black ppl

  29. Our descendants are smiling down on u . Way to represent our roots.

  30. All of human kind sprang forth from the continent of Africa and populated the world. ALL!

  31. I am not questioning peoples intelligence, however what is the point in all of this? We are humans, we all have a history. Every part of the world have contributed to the society that we live. Is the end goal separarion of people based on pigmentation?

  32. Steve Nash says:

    deny it all you want, it doesn't make it untrue.

  33. Yes, I am going to back the young lady in the video if you don't know where you are from find out. I just did a family and my great great great grand father is cape verdean and my great great great grand mother is from Nova Scotia from the 1880's it is nice and fun to find this out and you have to love yourself to live the fullest.

  34. Sara Devine says:

    I don't think she's talking about contributions to society. I think her message is far more personal than that, in saying that individuals should be able to truthfully embrace ALL of themselves. There happens to be a lot of obviously "melanated" people who will proudly proclaim that they hail from five different places before they ever mention Africa…if they do at all.
    It's your prerogative, of course to deny or accept Africa. But, for people like myself and apparently, this young lady in the video, I feel you're missing out on a RICH culture and history, whose influences are still being discovered all the time.
    It's all about bravely loving who you are, even and especially the part that the world erroneously dismisses as substandard.

  35. You're Black get over it!! Sheesh! Remember our brother "Hannible" rode elephants to Italy and turned it black!! LoL!!!!

  36. Same so ….well said!!!!

  37. It's all well and good until you try to find an African to claim you. Then it's a different story altogether. If you're mixed, your roots aren't just African. A lot of black people don't seem to get that, or they are easily offended by it.

    A lot of African's dislike Western black people for trying to claim ownership of a nationality that belonged to their ancestors. Everyone these days want to claim Africa, but when you ask them about Africa they're clueless.

    Ask them to speak Somali or Swahili or Xhosa or any of the hundreds of languages and dialects and they don't know the first word, but they're African.

    Ask them about the culture and the customs and they don't know a lick past wearing a Dashiki, but they're African.

    Ask them about the history and they're clueless, except for maybe pyramids and Nelson Mendela… but they're African.

    No… you're not African. Your ancestors were African. You are part African.

    Hell, you ask most black people claiming to be African which of the 50+ countries, 9 territories or independent states their "roots" are from and they don't even know – but they're African.

    I'm not saying ignore your roots, but don't fool yourself into thinking you're African either. It takes more than big lips, nappy hair and the amount of a chemical in your skin to be African.

    And if before you get on your high horse and say I'm full of it do yourself a favor…

    Close your eyes and think of home. Think of your childhood, your fondest and even hardest memories. Think of where you grew up.

    Now answer this… What's in your heart?

    The plains of the African Serengeti? Rain forests? The highlands of the east or west regions of the continent? Maybe even a village built on a farmland?

    Or is it some street in a city with a zip code, or even a suburban neighborhood?

    There's your Africa my man.

  38. Hugh Holmes says:

    Sophia, Napoleon (or should I say Napoleao?) said Africa begins at the Pyrenees.

  39. Hugh Holmes says:

    Hell, Madeirans, Azoreans, Canarians, mainland Portuguese ALL have SOME hit of the tarbrush….

  40. Hugh Holmes says:

    You got it pegged, sweetheart. Also, there used to be NO Strait of Gibraltar–uh-oh…..

  41. Asa Sizemore says:

    Love love love her! She is absolutely right!

  42. Mad Faces says:

    CapeVerdian people: Beautifull unique Africans!

  43. Hugh Holmes says:

    The Black man was the 1st European, Joli.

  44. You said several times the world disgusting yes it is capeverdean do you papia Criolo kes arguem ki mesti comprendi kusa ki bu kre fla Na bu mensagi sera ki es ta ntendi MERKANO ( english) thanks!

  45. my parents are Vinci's my family is well mixed, but what you just said echoes the words of my father. From when I was young he made sure I knew my family was not just white or black or mixed variations of the two. Can't claim to know much about any culture pre SVG, but my ancestry stretches from Africa and Europe to the black sandy shores of SVG where my family was born.

  46. Nic Cruickshank I learned that the hard way. I used to think I'm black so my heritage is African and then I met Africans on a trip.

    Two of them were from Nigeria, and one of them was from Ghana, and I found out quickly that just because I'm black or I share a lot of physical qualities that I'm African.

    It turns out a lot of the things that people attribute to Africa, including family traditions that were passed on from way back aren't even African.

    Later I worked with a kid from Ethiopia, Abdul Rahman. Funny as hell, and he was asking me all these questions about some of the things that he's seen and I'm don't they do that in Africa too?

    He cracked me up. He asked me back, do all white man on the North American continent say yeehaw and slap their knee and chew tobacco? Then he just looked at me kind of stupid.

    Ever since then I made it a point to stay in touch with people from all the different place in Africa and the diversity is SO amazing.

    That idea that Africa is one thing took me a while to get over. In terms of anything really, politics, economics, whatever. It's so different.

    I use the example in Togo for example, or any of the most impoverished countries and they need things like water pumps and filtration systems.

    You look at the Republic of Congo, or the regions within the Central Africa Republic – they have high HIV cases and they health and health education.

    Turn around though and you're booking a vacation for you and your family in Sierra Leone.

    And then you find out what it is the different people an nationalities pride themselves in about their respective countries and it's totally mind blowing.

    One of the trips I have coming up is to Monrovia, Liberia for the music. They make guitars by hand there using the most basic tools, and as a musician myself I want to take in some of that culture.

    Maybe when get back Cuba will be open so I can visit there and take in their music culture too, because it's awesome.

  47. Nic Cruickshank I learned that the hard way. I used to think I'm black so my heritage is African and then I met Africans on a trip.

    Two of them were from Nigeria, and one of them was from Ghana, and I found out quickly that just because I'm black or I share a lot of physical qualities that I'm African.

    It turns out a lot of the things that people attribute to Africa, including family traditions that were passed on from way back aren't even African.

    Later I worked with a kid from Ethiopia, Abdul Rahman. Funny as hell, and he was asking me all these questions about some of the things that he's seen and I'm don't they do that in Africa too?

    He cracked me up. He asked me back, do all white man on the North American continent say yeehaw and slap their knee and chew tobacco? Then he just looked at me kind of stupid.

    Ever since then I made it a point to stay in touch with people from all the different place in Africa and the diversity is SO amazing.

    That idea that Africa is one thing took me a while to get over. In terms of anything really, politics, economics, whatever. It's so different.

    I use the example in Togo for example, or any of the most impoverished countries and they need things like water pumps and filtration systems.

    You look at the Republic of Congo, or the regions within the Central Africa Republic – they have high HIV cases and they health and health education.

    Turn around though and you're booking a vacation for you and your family in Sierra Leone.

    And then you find out what it is the different people an nationalities pride themselves in about their respective countries and it's totally mind blowing.

    One of the trips I have coming up is to Monrovia, Liberia for the music. They make guitars by hand there using the most basic tools, and as a musician myself I want to take in some of that culture.

    Maybe when get back Cuba will be open so I can visit there and take in their music culture too, because it's awesome.

  48. Dexter Nelson my perspective is now to acknowledge all and not just one of the groups of people who lead to the eventuality that is me. denying none, and recognizing them all. One of my closest cousins spent a year in Tanzania and came back more educated about the diversity not just from country to country but between different groups within them. thanks for sharing your perspective.

  49. Even if it's not part of your culture? Go to India for Diwali. Help them split bamboo and light the dias. Nothing like it. Festival of lights.

  50. Identify with what makes you feel better. ATT: and what about the white portuguese things you have? you don't point that on your coment… doesn't that identify you also? or only the black african things identify you? people should just stop caring so much about diferences tsc.

  51. I have to attend you that colonizers never tend to tell the truth since cape verde was the easiest way to go to brazil. Arabs called capeverde Aulil where they gained salt. And the romans called it the land of gorgons or hesperides. There are evidence of presence of people before the portugese came. And the afrikans of the mainland visted the islans also before the portugese went. Stones have been found in Sao Niclau and Sao Antao with coptic textes on them. Remember that the colonizers called tribes with knowlegde of astronomy and science savages. You can find the stones on the internet.

  52. Feia cabelo bedju. Do you know that song? Is that why Amilcar Cabral died for? To deny our relationship with Africa. I live in the netherlands and lot of cape verdeans really have problems with this kind of subject. Especially the badiu and sampadjudo convo is very much alive.

  53. @ Jane The Fonseca Ortet – Love the reference in regards to the Dogan tribe. I love how history teaches that the spaniards supposedly discovered America when it was already inhabited.

  54. Davri Fontes says:

    well said, gorgeous 🙂

  55. .
    More people need to simply realize that…
    by embracing the racist-'One-Drop Rule'.
    (and / or by using 'One-Droppist' terms.
    such as that of "Light-Skinned Black")… what they are actually doing is…
    'spitting in the face' of the Black-race.
    (and, thus, of their Black-ancestors)..
    Someone seriously needs to try to explain.
    to some people that… TO embrace the.
    racist-'One-Drop Rule' — IN REALITY —
    means TO support and uphold the false.
    idea of a (blood-based) "Black-Inferiority"..
    This Link below provides.
    more information on why.
    the racist-'One-Drop Rule'.
    should simply be rejected for.
    the racist-nonsense that it is..
    https://plus.google.com/u/0/b/102311719580461249997/102311719580461249997/posts/YB15Rfa5wat.
    — APGifts [allpeoplegifts AT gmail DOT com].

  56. I could not have said it clearer or better. Thanks you sister!

  57. blacks and whites , watch this video people at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aix-ccUBlKU.

  58. blacks and whites , watch this video people at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aix-ccUBlKU.

  59. Question. Considering the governments and or archeologist of Africa, Australia, Asia, India, the Pacific Islands, and the Americas have acknowledged that Negros are the original inhabitants of their lands (do your own research), then shouldn't we be called Planetarians? What happens if we substitute the term "African" with "Planetarian?" What happens if we substitute the concept of being from Mother Africa with the concept of being from Mother Earth?

  60. Cheryl Isles says:

    Joli- the Europeans created all these mixes for their pleasure, mulatto, creole etc. Don't be caught in the middle. You are black, you are beautiful, and you are African.

  61. Hugh Holmes A DROP OF INK….LOL.

  62. AND FOR THOSE THAT MIGHT NOT KNOW , YOU LITE SKINNED BECAUSE YUR GRANPARENTS WERE RAPED BY THEM NASTY SLAVE TRADERS…

  63. YO STEVE, THAT's BECAUSE THEY BELIEVE WHAT WHITE FOLKS TELL THEM AND WHAT THEY SEE ON T.V. ANYTHING TO FIT IN TO THIS PHONEY, FAKE COUNTRY.

  64. AND SONE AS THEY GET TO THIS COUNTRY WERE DO THEY MOVE, RIGHT TO THE HOOD….

  65. PORTUGUESE IS A LANGUAGE NOT A NATIONALITY…

  66. Typical negative mindset. Nobody said anything about blame, being 'less than' anyone else. You know what a heritage is? It's something owned by birth right (land and property, etc) or something passed through the generations like an inheritance.

    In this sense, traditions and beliefs that is part of your history.

    In order to claim any African heritage, the color of your skin and the texture of your hair is not heritage. To blatantly say it, being black don't make you African.

    Traditions and beliefs come from culture – as in the language for starters.

    If you don't even know where in Africa you come from (remember it's not a country but a continent with dozens of countries), what heritage can you claim when there are several dozen of those as well?

    How do you know if your ancestors were ones that came here willingly or those that were betrayed by their own people and sold into slavery?

    Without someone to claim you or validate you, you won't have one clue about who your ancestors were or where they came from.

    You were born an outsider and will always be one until you find someone that will claim you. You have to have ties that connect you to your ancestry or it's just arbitrary and won't mean a thing.

    Anyone can say they're from anywhere, wear the clothes, even speak the language, but that doesn't mean they are that thing – they're just pretending and faking it hoping to pass as one of them.

    When you connect with your ancestry though, it has to be tangible or you don't got nothing.

  67. Kate Britto says:

    I'm so glad to hear someone else feels like I do. I am Cape Verdean and I'm black and I'm proud.The Cape Verdean people are the most loving people I have ever met. We should be extremely proud of all our makeup.

  68. Peace Queen! Tell it like it is!

  69. Rell Martin says:

    Please do not feel per pressured into one drop ruling your self. People disregarding African ancestors is wrong, but disregarding their other ancestors are as well. It's okay to acknowledge African roots, however you cannot change the fact you're not pure African. Stop one drop ruling your self, and one drop ruling others. You cannot speak for every "black" for every black has not the same origin, or family history. "Blacks" Who know their ethnic make should be able to claim ANY of their choosing to pick as a culture. MY personal choice, is that of the Native American, I have both Choctaw and Cherokee from my great grandmothers (Separate) however, I honor both of their tribes. Not sure which I want to be adopted into. One thing for sure, I have no issue with having African ancestors, but I also have European and Native, it'd be disrespectful to disregard them to fight a cause I Do not believe in. People one drop rule themselves, and others by trying to shed light on African ancestry, which is wrong. Stop trying to live others lives for them. At the end of the day, we weren't born with this knowledge, or emotion towards the subject. When we die, we shall lose the emotion and knowledge we obtained. We all die alone. So if one wants to acknowledge one group of ancestors over the other, let him, JUST AS LONG AS HE OR SHE DOESN'T DRAG A WHOLE CLASSIFICATION OF PEOPLE WITH THEM. That's the part that causes conflict, a "civil war" within the "Black" community if you must. Not all of us have the same, or know of each others family history. However I support your indivisual cause 100%. I my self, don't feel a connection to African culture due to the various amount of countries within. I've always felt connected to native because of their views being so connected to mother earth, the root of all races. If I had the ability to end pain and suffering, as well as conflict. I'd do so for mother Earth, not just Europe, Africa, or What was my Native ancestors land. One for all, or all for none. Arguing with the one drop rule will only blacken the hearts of many, and fuel the rage. When I tell my kids about this topic, I'll tell them there's African Ancestry, as well as European and Native, and to choose whichever one THEY feel connected to, and not to disrespect others views on their identity.

  70. Rell Martin says:

    No matter how you look at it, the one who raped the African woman is just as much as your ancestor, as the African woman. Their parents, and grandparents are your ancestors as well as the African woman's (rape may not always be the case, love has a weird way of showing up no matter the era.) So please think of many different scenarios, rather than the one that's being shoved down our throats by those who did not live in those times.

  71. Rell Martin says:

    Leland Creecy Not really, seeing as most Americans who claim to be African can not name a direct culture or country they have relevance to. Even if we were all African, there are countries and culture that would separate us. (Countries and cultures and Africa).

  72. it don't matter they breathe & bleed just like everyone else! stop hating and just hug the next person you see.

  73. But Cape Verde is in Africa so she is "not part African" that makes her African. not all the countries share the same culture or beliefs. if she was born in Cape Verde then she is African. according to you it is impossible to be an African.

  74. Would be true if we were talking physical location alone. Cape Verde was uninhabited until 1456 and became part of the Portuguese empire and it remained a colony until 1951 when it became a province and all of it's citizens were declared fully Portuguese citizens (1960 or 61 – I need to check on the exact year).

    Then there was an independence movement that freed both Cape Verde and Guinea-Bissau, and they became independent in 1975. It's actually called the Republic of Cabo Verde now.

    And even though there is a mix between African and Portuguese, Cape Verde remains independent. I know that date because a year later, my home country became a republic.

    And like my home country there is something else we have in common. Cape Verde isn't in Africa. it's off the coast of Africa.

    My home country isn't in South America, it's off the coast of South America.

    Just like we don't consider ourselves South American, Cape Verde isn't Africa either.

    As you say, many different cultures.

  75. Robert Weathersby you are wrong.

  76. hahah read that again, you are stupid. how does CV act?

  77. Brother miss me with that bullshit I lived on Bowdoin street in Dorchester, most of y'all don't consider yourself to be black. So quick to call someone preto.

  78. Preto is a color not nationality.

  79. Gomez Lefty says:

    you are beautiful. Long Live the revolutionist Amilcar Cabral.. A lot of our Latin American brothers fail to see the African routes also. The chattel slavery days mixed alot of people together to make countries we know today.

  80. Theo Hines says:

    Dear Puerto Ricans and Dominicans.

  81. I have to clarify something here. When you say Cape Vrdeans you need to be more specific. There different types of Cape Verdeans now a days. You have the different islands where you will find significant differences in ethos, you have different the complexions to take into consideration, and you have the ones who are still living in cv and others who are living abroad. Each and everyone of these groups have their different ways. When I was growing up in Santiago it seemed like everything was pro-african. You could hear it in the music, you could see it in the culture and the people. A common flag I would often see around Praia being represented next to the Cape Verdean flag was the black liberation flag. The only place it seems like Cape Verdean don’t think they are black is America. America has brainwashed its people to hate African-Americans. They are perceived as being lazy, dumb, violent thugs with no history prior to the transatlantic slave trade. When more Cape Verdeans started to come to America around the 70s and saw the hate Africans and African-Americans had to deal with they chose to say they were Portuguese for the sake of avoiding racism. As for these second and third generation Cape Verdeans in America, a lot of them have lost their language and culture; so what are they really? I'll stop here but you and everyone out there really need to research into these things a little bit more. Do you really think a whole nation of people really think they are not black or africans although their country is in the african continent? I feel like I am debasing myself just for commenting but I hope people reading this will do some research and get rid of this misconception.

  82. No, it's true! maybe you alone.

  83. If you are the lady In the video, then come to Amerikkka to let the good WHITE FOLKS let you know who you REALLY ARE! Peace…..

  84. Jim Scales says:

    African lineage is often denied worldwide, the problem you spoke of is not limited to Cape Verdeans. That same mindset of deniability is also commonplace among North African Arabs, and more succinctly among Central and South Americas. Mother AFRICA has touched some many cultures and peoples, and yet are reviled worldwide. It is sad and ignorant, however I would be interested in researching precisely where and when the association between darker skin and subservience was made. Melaninated people have contributed so much to world civilization, and yet are the most abused …… To this very day…

  85. Gina Stevens Pat's point was that all of us originated from Africa.
    If you believe in Evolution, then all human life began in Africa.

  86. Hugh Holmes actually all humans do.
    According to Evolution, all human life began in Africa.
    Technically, everybody is of African descent.

  87. Sophia Silva, please send a message to me because my message would go into your "Other" folder.

  88. Ngoma glad you put that low life sell out in his place. He was super negative from he started his rambling as if the black pple today are only to blame for the current status ignoring all the steps and tactics that was used from slavery till today. It's no wonder why people would rather claim anything that's not black African you could see the desperation in this young man and his Afro and dark skin says it all .yeah your mixed and at the end of the day u black

  89. You are wrong. And it is not their fault that they can't understand their culture. It is where they are brought up. But they really have that connection.

  90. By that logic everyone is African and has a connection… since all life started in Africa and all. Maybe the Europeans should go to Africa and start claiming land because their ancestors were there too. They wouldn't be wrong.

  91. Dexter, I cannot see where I said anything negative but since you were clearly looking for negativity it is no real wonder you found it. If people are happy to have discovered themselves or at least what they are happy to consider themselves to be and you have given yourself the task of convincing them they are wrong, then may you be happy but may you also fail my brother. For even if your arguments were sound – and they are not – you would still be wrong to put them. Fortunately there are many of us that having learned what we truly are will not allow you to unlearn it. The main
    Problem you have is that you allow chance meetings to determine what you consider yourself to be. If those you see as 'real Africans' had welcomed you as such, you would have considered you would have known yourself to be an African. It is a good job that you did not meet a group of ducks, because all now you would be quacking. By the way, whether you were captured, betrayed or left voluntarily does not in anyway affect what you are. You think that if you went to Mars you would become a Martian if a family of them told you you were? Maybe you should revisit your arguments and come again. Having said all that, you did provide me with done good for thought . Peace.

  92. I bet that you chase after Cape Verdean mama's though.

  93. She's not sure what the hell she is saying. I have never had one Cape Verdean claiming to be African explain what that means. When I ask, they just get mad and go on the attack. She's probably born in Pawtucket RI. To me, it's just a cry for attention and acceptance.

  94. I'm Cape Verdean and identify with my African brothers and sisters. Despite this, I would appreciate posters, pictures and other images of Africa to also include CV. Am I the only one seeing this?

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