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5 thoughts on “Two Surviving Freedom Riders Tell Their Graphic Story of a KKK Attack — And It Is Riveting

  1. Portia Gathers says:

    hmmm…..tell him to get over it! You think it didn't affect him, her, their children in some way, shape, or form.

  2. Bewuste Wombman says:

    Devils!!!!

  3. Diane Lunn says:

    Not able to view the videos.

  4. Darrin Dickerson says:

    Bunch of corp ads, but it won't show you the video! Middle finger to the Toyota ads that block what's important. Keep your sorry corp sellout spam site

  5. From 1882 to 1964, the archives at Tuskegee University documented that at least 3,445 African Americans were brutally lynched in the United States.

    The actual process of lynching was morbid and incredibly violent. Lynching does not necessarily mean hanging. It often included humiliation, torture, burning, dismemberment and castration. Victims were beaten and whipped, many times in front of large crowds that sometimes numbered in the thousands. Coal tar was frequently used to douse the unfortunate victim prior to setting him afire.

    Onlookers sometimes fired rifles and handguns hundreds of times into the corpse while people cheered and children played during the festivities. Pieces of the corpse were taken by onlookers as souvenirs of the event. Such was the case when James Irwin was lynched on January 31, 1930. Irwin was accused of the murder of a white girl in the town of Ocilla, Georgia. Taken into custody by a rampaging mob, his fingers and toes were cut off, his teeth pulled out by pliers and finally he was castrated. It still wasn't enough. Irwin was then burned alive in front of hundreds of onlookers (Brundage, p. 42). No one was ever punished for this barbaric killing. Black victims were hacked to death, dragged behind cars, burned, beaten, whipped, sometimes shot thousands of times, mutilated; the savagery was astonishing.

    Gado goes on to say:

    Sensational journalism, then the standard of American news reporting, spared the public no detail no matter how horrible. "The Negro was deprived of his ears, fingers and genital parts of his body. He pleaded pitifully for his life while the mutilation was going on…before the body was cool, it was cut to pieces, the bones crushed into small bits…the Negro's heart was cut into several pieces, as was also his liver…small pieces of bones went for 25 cents…" (The Springfield Weekly Republican, April 28, 1899). This was an actual description of the lynching of one Sam Holt, accused murderer, who was burned at the stake in Newman, Georgia in April, 1899. Graphic accounts like this were in abundance throughout the South. They served both white and black purposes by adding to the psychological suffering of the African American and empowered the white man to do more.

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