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Monday, July 7th, 2014

Bob Dylan: Slavery Ruined America

Folk rock legend Bob Dylan has some strong words about America that many of his compatriots may not want to hear: He says the stigma of slavery ruined America and he doubts whether the country can get rid of the shame because it was “founded on the backs of slaves.”

Dylan spoke to Rolling Stone for a cover story that coincides with the release of his 35th studio album, “Tempest.” Dylan has long been an outspoken critic of American culture and its inherent inequalities, particularly during the 1960s when his songs “Blowin’ in the Wind” and “The Times They Are a-Changin’” voiced his generation’s support for civil rights and anger at the Vietnam War.

In his interview with Rolling Stone, Dylan, who has won just about every music and songwriting award on the planet, seems intent not so much on attacking America for its racist history but observing that racism has long been holding the country back.

“People (are) at each other’s throats just because they are of a different color,” he said. “It will hold any nation back.”

A 71-year-old man born in Minnesota at a time when blacks in many parts of the country couldn’t eat in white restaurants or use white water fountains, Dylan has seen a great deal of America’s progress and evolution during the past century—all the way to the election of the first black president. But clearly he has not seen enough progress. And he thinks it all goes back to the country’s founding.

He tells Rolling Stone that blacks know that some whites “didn’t want to give up slavery.” Only after a civil war cleaved the nation in two did slavery come to a reluctant end—after more than 600,000 Americans (including 260,000 Southerners) died in a war that started because the South wanted to preserve the institution.

“If slavery had been given up in a more peaceful way, America would be far ahead today,” Dylan observes.

When the magazine asked if the election of President Obama was helping to bring about a change, Dylan says: “I don’t have any opinion on that. You have to change your heart if you want to change.”

The magazine’s new issue hits newsstands Friday.

About Nick Chiles

Nick Chiles is a Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist and New York Times bestselling author. He has written or co-written 12 books and won over a dozen major journalism awards during a journalism career that brought him to the Dallas Morning News, the Star-Ledger of New Jersey and New York Newsday, in addition to serving as Editor-in-Chief of Odyssey Couleur travel magazine.

Comments

  1. Absolutely Mr. Dylan. I'm so glad someone finally has said it, actually even happier it was a White person, because when White people say things about the facts of slavery other White people listen, when Blacks say it, people say we're complaining. We've come far but we got a long way to go.

  2. Yes, the (former?) existence of slavery in the U.S. is ALWAYS the elephant in the room; it's ideologies has survived via indoctrination from the original racist generation to the next, overtly or subtly….. herein lies our current problems…..

  3. I was just thinking the same thing. Can we ever equalize the shame with the powers of love amid so much ingrained hatred? Can hearts change?

  4. What an idiot. There isn't a nation or people on the Earth that doesn't have slavery in their history. Bob Dylan might have some moral force if he'd decide what he believes and stick to it. But his opinions and positions are like the song he wrote – "blowin' in the wind" – changing with each new day.

  5. Slavery was wrong. Especially all those Africans rounding up blacks for the slave ships. But the biggest mistake was not re-patriating all those slaves back to Africa. America would have been a much better country if that happened. Blacks are a plague on American society.

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