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61 thoughts on “This Video Will Make You Think Twice About Ever Calling Someone’s Name ‘Ghetto’

  1. Olivia Hicks says:

    Awesome!!!

  2. Lyndon Allen says:

    She`s missing her call, she can be a Rap Artiste.

  3. Jim Scales says:

    Very well put together by this young lady. My only question is why names that 'remind us or sounds like' the tribal or ethnic African names…… Why not use the actual names?

  4. Paa Hawkins says:

    Ubasti Amaunet All the hostility because I posted something constructive? 9 times out of 10 in any debate on any level I'd trash you. Your response is that of someone with an I.Q. of 10. And as for education, check our resume. We hold one of the largest Homeschool forums on Facebook. Now come again stupid?

  5. Shon McClure says:

    Don't give your children stupid names. Problem solved.

  6. Jemila TS says:

    "'Sounds like' & 'close to' will never be 'this is' or 'this means.'" I don't agree with that. Names or sounds from one language will change over time and space as people move about. What is the difference between Matthew, Mattieu, and Mathias? They are all the same name with same or similar meanings, just different spellings and pronounciations based on the group of people and the place. I think this same reasoning could be applied to those "ghetto names." The sounds that comprise them can be linked back to sounds in African names, and there's nothing wrong with that. Even if the people who create these names are not aware of the similarities between the sounds or name segments, do they really need to be damned for trying to be creative? It's unfortunate that society as a whole seems to devalue anything that Black people do, and profile us for things such as our names. But does that realy mean that we have to give up trying to give our names value? I understand that kids with these long names may be victims of profiling or prejudice, but I think that we need to change our perceptions. Once we embrace those names, and carry them with pride, things would change for the better. I strongly believe that.

  7. Jemila TS says:

    But that was my point. They have similar origins, even though they have changed over time. I was just trying to put this whole name thing into a different perspective. Who's to say that diminuitives of African names have not survived in other parts of the African diaspora? Who's to say that these names are not in some way, no matter how small, connected back to something of substance? Afterall, we can't forget the other linguistic cultures that existed and exist in the US (and elsewhere) such as the First Nations. I'm not a linguist, sociologist or anthorpologist, and I don't know that anyone's done much research on names of the same ilk as 'Deontrayshia' but maybe if more of us took an interest into researching these types of things, we may even find that they do in fact come from somewhere.

  8. Ubasti Amaunet says:

    Paa Hawkins …. Wrong again! With all of that education I would expect you to consider at least two aspects of this equation. One is that the root of the language which causes us to develop these names one would call ghetto. These names are directly related to a combination of broken English and the motherland Africa no matter what area your roots may be and that's not debatable (as evident by African diaspora). Second is broken English. During slavery people weren't taught to read nor proper English simply bc they did not have that right. The white people whom they learned from were just as ignorant to proper "English". The different African dialects fused together with English to make what we so call now "Ebonics." What it actually shows is an evolution….people evolving around the circumstances in which one has to adapt in order to communicate with each other. Really what is comes to is that on one hand you have a connection to your mother period and you do it innately whether it is naming your child a "ghetto" name or braiding your daughter hair we have been doing it for millenniums. One the other it makes me wonder if there is a such thing as sounding black when the only thing you could really sound like is those who taught you how to speak improper English at your roots (and no i'm talking about your mama). But this is my thoughts with a bit of fact. Own what you want but I wouldn't want you to be teaching my child that bullshit.

  9. Paa Hawkins says:

    Ubasti Amaunet Get out of your feelings and be for real- How can one attribute their actions to something they don't know about? How many women in the projects honestly know and understand what that girl just said in the video? How many of our people actually take the time to find the meaning of a name for our children prior to saying "it sounds cute" how many even care to for that matter? How many of us do what our ancestors did and name a child based on THEIR personality or the day of the week THEY were born or the order in which THEY were born? How many of us really did that PRIOR to naming the child? Not many I guarantee. So whether the name NOW reminds you of the Gullah or Creo is irrelevant to the fact that current generations do not do that. Bonquisha may have African roots, but put money on it that her mama and daddy didn't know that. You can't always always justify everything our people do.

  10. Ubasti Amaunet says:

    You may be absolutely right in your assumptions that many do not do the research. But I did say innately….meaning you do it bc it's in your DNA…….learned behaviors which are transferrable into our DNA makeup……FACT. I gave the example of braiding hair and many of us do not understand the significance of those actions. Many don't understand why we do it we just do it and the same rule of thumbs can be applied to the way we name our children and the way we communicate with each other. Understanding the current system in which we live I do recognize that it is not acceptable. However, that does not make it inferior and should be respected and not frowned upon. As an African American I feel it is important to show respect to the mothers of our sisters who have these "ghetto" names and support them against that status quo. I see it to be pointless to be divided amongst each other over a name bc the system we live in find it unprofessional .

  11. Don't justify that bs.. Wanna know why Muslims name their children Malik…. Khalid… Shakur… Because it reminds them of God. What does Shaneiqwa mean? What does Marquellas mean? I aint saying go with "traditional" names but made up stuff ain't cool. Maybe if more of our people took on 2nd and third languages… We wouldn't be forced to put our children through this nonsense. Of the four Shanequas. I know…. Three of them are hookers!!! Doesn't that say something?? Cause the fourth is on crack!!! Child please!!

  12. you feed into the very stereotype she is talking about…..shame on you.

  13. Because these women do not know the real African names, like Tamika, a hybrid of Tamiko which is JAPANESE. There are those of us that just want to be different, and most of them aren't very bright.

  14. Ubasti Amaunet I could not disagree with you more. if we want to give our kids African names do it. But most of these folks create hybrid African, Japanese, French with a hint of BS. And if you want your child to grow up respected raise them correctly. Note, there are good ol' white names hated as well. Sometimes it is what it is….just plain stupid, and you can tell by the women and men that choose to do this to their kids.

  15. Perhaps we could do something similar to what Cathlics used to do: have a "name" and another "name." The reality is that we live in this country,, where our culture does not dominate economically, therefore, we have to name our children in such a way that they are not penalized for it. We still have room to be creative with the additional name (like a "middle name"), that is reserved for intimate(i.e. family) use.

  16. Qima King says:

    3 hookers and a crackhead?…..you should know better people in general!

  17. Robin Baptiste It's not a stereotype, I'm using stats. PERSONAL stats. It's kinda like the same reason I would NEVER name my child after an ex-girlfriend. I had a bad experience with such and such. Why in the hell would I give myself a reminder of that foolishness? So if Shameeka or Tondalaya doesn't fit the vision I have for my child, why put her through that? Khalia was a safe choice. Not unique, but it describes the way I see my child. PLUS, she's been spared the shame of having every teacher mispronounce her name in school.

  18. I used to work for the local welfare office, processing new applications to be handed to the eligibility workers. I would see some NAMES OF ALL TIME, the level of creativity, if that is what you want to call it? From some crazy broken minded young women in the 'hood. I am serious. I cannot of course, remember them all, but there were some doozies, guaranteed to not help your child get employment. What are we thinking? "Qua" "esha" "isha" "Tre or Tray" many others… WHAT ARE WE THINKING ABOUT? Or? Is this they just young and crazy? Many, very young mothers, can barely read and write, I am FOR REAL.

  19. There SHOULD be meaning to the name!

  20. The creativity in names? I just get chills when I hear what some of these babies are named! We on something, and it ain't common sense. We need to be "marketable", in the long haul.

  21. Now that's what I love to hear a strong woman

  22. Hold on so u dont like ur name being criticized but the first name u choose to use as an example with a smart ass tone that serves as an implication that u believe the shirt.list of.names to be basic and lacking in some way is.mine hypocrite. Gtfoh

  23. I think there is a big difference between African names and and other names that have been invented by people who simply cannot spell. People should be proud of their African ethnic names. Those names are respected in general.

  24. I agree that they should do a little bit of research and use the authentic African names, not names that might approximate them. Those approximations are frequently butchering any logical spelling.

  25. Larry Junior says:

    I don't like loud women.

  26. phenix: most parents that give their kids those types of names, don't think about their kids being in corporate America, because they are not thinking outside their world. but kids usually stride a little further than we do. most of these names are made up by womens, well educated womens, don't name their kids unique names like that because they know the results.

  27. Give them a name that "sounds like" rather than the actual original name? OK fine. But do they know the meaning? Over time the meaning is lost after years of customizing names if the meaning and origins arent passed down.

  28. Scarlett Scar you are a case point and example of what I'm talking about. You said we need to be "marketable" in the long haul right? Lets stop sugar coating it and call it was it IS. Marketable= a name that white people like because they are the ones we depend for jobs. Don't you see the problem in that? Imagine if white people said things like this in reverse. If they were mindful about what names were acceptable to US when they named their child. You couldn't even picture that could you? That's because they are not slave minded and WE are. What you just said is just yet another example of how this mental sickness that african people have manifests itself.

  29. It's very stereotypical, I've seen shredded resumes with ghetto names, because of the names. when I had my daughter I made sure I gave her a regular name, not some stupid, hard to spell and harder to pronounce name. I could just imagine how my office will run with ghetto Fab employees. Start them off with a chance, with a proper name.

  30. Riana Keve says:

    Actually it just speaks volumes about the company you keep. Not the Sheniquahs of the world. #youfail

  31. FAB LAB says:

    Jules Hernadi I think people should be proud of their name either way. Most of the language we speak is a twisted derivative of other languages. There are a zillion impressions and therefore inspirations being made right now. Just because they aren't educated means that they shouldn't name their child whatever we want? So we blame them for our society's tendency to generalize, classify and sterilize? No I think we should all be more open minded instead. Appreciate the Chaqueneesha's (I totally just made that up by the way and quite like it indeed), as much as the Nefertiti's (you said African so here you go) – and the Tiffany's just as much as the Dan's. I mean I think the name Dan is boring but do I meet a person and interject that feeling onto them? No! I get to know Dan for who he is, the same as I would Chaqueneesha. And I suggest, for the betterment of humankind, you do the same. Judge people on their Character. Who gets to dictate who’s name has meaning and who doesn’t. It was all made up once ANYway but a human being! So if someone feels inspired to conjure up – HEAVEN FORBIDE – something we actually haven’t heard of, I think we should appreciate it. Original ideas are hard to come by.

  32. Riana Keve says:

    Jules Hernadi I think people should be proud of their name either way. Most of the language we speak is a twisted derivative of other languages. There are a zillion impressions and therefore inspirations being made right now. Just because they aren't educated means that they shouldn't name their child whatever they want? So we blame them for our society's tendency to generalize, classify and sterilize? No I think we should all be more open minded instead. Appreciate the Chaqueneesha's (I totally just made that up by the way and quite like it indeed), as much as the Nefertiti's (you said African so here you go) as much as the Tiffany's just as much as the Dan's. I mean I think the name Dan is boring but do I meet a person and interject that feeling onto them? No! I get to know Dan for who he is, the same as I would Chaqueneesha. And I suggest, for the betterment of humankind, you do the same. Judge people on their Character.

  33. Riana Keve says:

    Who gets to dictate who’s name has meaning and who doesn’t. It was all made up once ANYway but a human being! So if someone feels inspired to conjure up – HEAVEN FORBIDE – something we actually haven’t heard of, I think we should appreciate it. Original ideas are hard to come by.

  34. Austin Williford is so right. Black people have been programed to like European names. We have been brainwashed for years.

  35. You mean a name like Shon? At least learn to spell the name.

  36. I know a Shaniqua Johnson who is a successful lawyer. You're as ignorant as members of other races who judge people based on their name. The name does not have to hold meaning for you, because it is not for you. Many people probably think Abu sounds like a ridiculous name. And using you own PERSONAL stats to pass judgement on the rest of the world is EXTREMELY ignorant.

  37. Anyone who refuses to hire someone based on their name is a biased bigot who does not need to be in a position to hire.

  38. What about the names Rusty, blanket, Rainy, Forrest and other crazy names like that. Don't judge a person by their names. That's all she was saying. Some of you took it to another level.

  39. Why do you feel the need to explain a you're name there is no link to Africa it's not true enough with the reference to Africa you're name is just something you're parent wanted to call you it could be stupid or cute but it's yours and I like tiff any better than yours it's difficult not just for whites but for everyone

  40. Why do you feel the need to explain a you're name there is no link to Africa it's not true enough with the reference to Africa you're name is just something you're parent wanted to call you it could be stupid or cute but it's yours and I like tiff any better than yours it's difficult not just for whites but for everyone

  41. Why do you feel the need to explain a you're name there is no link to Africa it's not true enough with the reference to Africa you're name is just something you're parent wanted to call you it could be stupid or cute but it's yours and I like tiff any better than yours it's difficult not just for whites but for everyone

  42. Shon McClure says:

    It's Korean if you're unintersted. Hopefully you actually know the proper spelling for "lady" unless your parents believed that were being creative. I'm not sure of whether or not to mock you or just assume you're retarded for using the name of an Egyptian queen as your surname on your page. Enlighten me since my parents who chose one of the spelling options for my name taught me not to make fun of those who may be disabled. From Maryland but thinks of herself as royalty. Doesn't DC have a high rate of violence, Cleo? Clearly you aren't doing your job. Kill yourself.

  43. I have seen this as well and it wasn't out of being stereotypical but out of sheer embarrassment of calling someone and butchering their name. I have butchered plenty of names myself and had one girl I will never forget I called her name I said it wrong and she cussed me out and called me ignorant and bugie, because she had a difficult name that I tried my best to pronounce. So I understand where this girl is coming from but no we can do better.

  44. Toya Grace says:

    Abu, and a handful of you others are being very ignorant in your statements, and judgemental. You're saying a name MUST have a meaning, but you chose your kids name because it is safe… You are a scared little bitch! Trust me when I say, my name does not make me..

  45. Why not just name the kids real African names instead of Shaniqua-Sangria Smith? So focused on history then research actual names instead of pretending these ghetto names are based on African history. THEY ARE NOT. And the breathing between the stanzas was annoying. Sounding like she was about to have an asthma attack. Appreciate the message but not the overstretched application of African history.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6ycchmeY568&list=UUYFVOfADDbzsz3zP-0dr9YQ

  46. Karl DeSean says:

    This poem does not make me think twice about calling someone's name ghetto. Nothing has been lost in translation. She wrote that poem to make her and other girls/women like her feel better about their messed up names.

  47. Brian Gocher says:

    People mispronounce my last name all the time. I don't swirl my head and correct them with attitude. I have had to hire people before and I can say that such a deed is what leads me to throw your resume in the trash, and not your name. You will never go wrong by keeping it classy.

  48. That's amazing because I Know two Amys that are hookers, one Aimee that's a crackhead. Guess they should have chose less suburban names. It;s like Jewish people I know, who use different or shorten their names to sound less Jewish, and Asians, and East Indians etc. I dated a guy who had a full out Irish name, always got interview calls, but the looks on their faces when they realized he wasn't Irish, said it all. To choose a name or change a name to appeal to the masses is ridiculous! BTW, it's not shameful to have your name mispronounced! Correct them and move on. People of all cultures have their names mispronounced. SMH! The syndrome is real!

  49. That's amazing because I Know two Amys that are hookers, one Aimee that's a crackhead. Guess they should have chose less suburban names. It;s like Jewish people I know, who use different or shorten their names to sound less Jewish, and Asians, and East Indians etc. I dated a guy who had a full out Irish name, always got interview calls, but the looks on their faces when they realized he wasn't Irish, said it all. To choose a name or change a name to appeal to the masses is ridiculous! BTW, it's not shameful to have your name mispronounced! Correct them and move on. People of all cultures have their names mispronounced. SMH! The syndrome is real!

  50. To be a rapper these days, your words have to not make sense.

  51. wow…she speaks so much truth….I know when a potential employer sees my name he/she knows I'm black. But I'm not ashamed of being black…so…..

  52. smh…reading these comments…It's a shame how black people have internalized white supremacy. But I'll love myself, my blackness, black people, and my super black name enough for all of y'all #loveandlight.

  53. Honestly I think it's our people using our creative genes. I never heard of any slave masters named Shameka, Lakeisha etc.. Even if these names are made up it still says to me I want to disconnect from these slave giving names which have no meaning either. And as for Muslim names some people don't care what the meaning is they would still link you as a terrorist in which we know isn't true. So how could one link these creative names to being ignorant smh. Also one could have the most religious spiritual name in the world but if they are not living up to what that names represents having it is just useless.

  54. Fuse Collins says:

    Guess you missed the part about the african heritage subconsiously emerging.

  55. Alex Primo says:

    Excellent words my sister. We must never let the mainstream society minimize our concept of beauty, sense of style, or the very name that we carry. Our love for ourselves and our people should shine through our being and broadcast positive energy throughout our community while simultaneously shattering all negative vibes that dare to threaten our betterment. #One

  56. Qima King Actually, they were just people I grew up with. Not to mention, I'm a an addictions counselor, genius! Out of 10 women I work with that are "Black", Over half of them have one of these "made up" names. These names are a product of a particular environment. and Ms. Robin Baptise… If you were comfortable in your own skin, you wouldn't use someone else's picture as YOUR profile picture, I'm just saying.

  57. Kalin Maurice Leonard I see your point, Brother. But what I think he's saying is, in the big scheme of things, those names (can) come with a bad taste. If my daughter, Khalia, came and asked if she could go to the show with…. Teteaquanda and Shanellaria, I would think they were from another country or something, but if she said, "no, they're from the projects over on such and such, I wouldn't be so fast to say, Yeah Khalia, go along. Now if she said Safia, or Malika, I would already have it in my mind that, maybe they're Muslim but, to each it's own. My child will NOT have one of these made up names. Period.

  58. Robert Butler If we roll with the idea that we "like" European names or what have you, then cool. I'll rock with you, but when you actually NAME your child one of these "made up names" how much of that is for the child, and how much of it is for YOU?

  59. Chelsea Petite

    I had a "unique" name. It rhymed with a male body part. I hated introductions. I went by a nickname for years. I finally had it legally changed. My name did not have a meaning. I do not see the purpose in naming a child a name that sounds like a tribal name. Why not give them the actual tribal name and meaning? To me, my unique name was a burden.

  60. Jules Hernadi WHO says that a name has to be "logical?"….

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