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145 thoughts on “12 Racist Statements That Should Never Go Unchallenged

  1. Angelica Harris-Milton says:

    Are these comments still racist if one black person said this to another black person? It happened to me in school. Those kids/young adults tried to make my life hell.

  2. I think they are taught racism from society…meaning that they are racist but not created in those individuals. A lot of black people don't get that its that tho.

  3. Simon Si says:

    Actually, this is a free country with 1st Amendment rights, people can say whatever they want (except yelling fire in a crowded theater). What you really meant to say is why do Blacks react differently when the -N- word is uttered by whites? The answer is rather quite obvious; Whites have a history of using the -N- word where its usage was rooted in hatred and racism. Take for example certain slavery foods like pig intestines and pig feet, blacks can eat them at will and even joke around with each other about eating them, including Fried Chicken, but if a white person would crack a joke about Blacks eating Fried Chickens or pigs intestines, then BLACKS REACT VERY DIFFERENTLY to that, even though Blacks themselves not only still eat those foods, but even poke fun at each other about the culinary practice. And that's also because just like with the -N- word, Whites also have a history of force-feeding Blacks those unhealthy foods out of hatred and racism. What it all boils down to is context and history.

  4. Every last one of those irritates me to no end! LOL. I'm going to start telling white people, how 'articulate' they are when, and if, they ever speak the kings English correctly.

  5. Yes it is. The worst kind of racism is self hate.

  6. When someone says "why can't I say the N Word" just ask them why they want to say it so bad.

  7. Jacqueline McGee Smith says:

    I agree with everything that you just said, but I'd like to add the point that just because you can *say* it, doesn't mean that what you say will go unchallenged or unchecked, or that you will not be 'punished' for it. What all the available historical data sources available to so many, ignorance is all too often a choice, and I think it should be treated as such.

  8. Sandie Abel says:

    Dumb x dumb=OMGWTF!

  9. Why does anyone want to say it?

  10. Sandie Abel says:

    Dumb x dumb=OMGWTF

  11. Steve Beinart good question, it won't go unchallenged if used around me by anyone of any color.

  12. I only take issue with one of these. If I'm having a conversation with someone who's expressing themselves clearly and staying on topic, I'll tell them they're articulate because they are. I'm a transplanted south side Milwaukee biker. We pay you a compliment, you've earned it, end of story.

  13. What's even more disappointing is that when I was growing up coming through school, half of those statements were asked to me by my Black classmates.

  14. I like the way things were. When a racist would tell you he was a racist and you knew to deal with that individual appropriate. Today everyone is on such good behavior, you can bring that beast home.

  15. Lori Shoup says:

    I say you people all the time….. I am not a racist, when I say it I'm talking about a group of people and color of skin is not a factor, that's just how I'm addressing a group of people. I am not saying it trying to be racist. Some people say ya'll to me that sounds like a hillbilly, some say youse people that to me sounds uneducated. I just never thought that you people was considered to be a racist comment.

  16. Simon Si Thanks for that common sense explanation. People act like they're stupid.

  17. Now why would you be flying the flag of Hitler's Waffen SS battallion that was solely responsible for killing blacks? Where some of my people(Africans and whites) in other Armies had to get at them.

  18. The answer is simple. It comes from an arrogant place of believing they're superior by default ingrained since thier rearing.

  19. Thomas Griffin says:

    A PERSON CAN USE ANY WORD THEY CHOOSE ITS THEIR RIGHT , AS FOR ME I HATE TO HEAR ANYONE USE THE N- WORD I STOPED USEING IT A LONG TIME AGO, IT WAS SOMETHING I DESIDED TO DO OUT OF RESPECT FOR MYSELF AND OTHERS , BUT I ALSO STOPPED USEING MANY OTHER WORD OF A DEROGATORY NATURE BECAUSE I FOUND I KNOWLONGER NEEDED THEM, I GUESS THOSE DECISION COME WITH MATURITY AS MANY THINGS DO. SO THERE ARE MANY OTHER THINGS TO CONCERN YOURSELFS WITH BESIDES THIS ONE LITTLE WORD , AND WHITE FOLK USE IT IF YOU LIKE, JUST BE PREPARED TO DEAL WITH THE CONSEQUENCES OF YOUR ACTIONS .BESIDES MOST INTELLIGENT WHITE FOLK KNOW ITS A SOFT SPOT FOR A BLACK PERSON SO THEY KNOW WHAT THIER DOING WHEN THEY USE THAT WORD AND ANY OTHER RACIST REMARK . SO IN THE WORDS OF RODNEY KING CANT WE ALL JUST GET ALONG!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! LOOK TOO GOD AND DO SOMETHING GOOD FOR YOUR FELLOW MAN NOMATTER WHO HE IS WE NEED THAT MORE AND MORE IN OUR WORLD TODAY . PLEASE !!!!!!!!!

  20. Sandie Abel says:

    Mōšeh Libellule AzubuikeAmo RuhIsrail , The flag you see in the picture is actually an English pirate flag from the late 16th/early17th century.

    The pirates' name was Thomas Tew, and he is an ancestor of my brother Pleading and myself. He began as a British privateer; which meant he could legally raid French and Spanish ships as long as he divided up the goodies with the British government.

    When Britain made peace with the French and Spanish, Thomas Tew and his crew sailed around the African continent. They raided Arab ships till Tew was killed in a battle with the Arab shippers.

    The remaining crew members settled in Madagascar and married local women, so we have relatives in Madagascar:) There is still a cemetery there where the former pirates were buried when they died.

  21. Mōšeh Libellule AzubuikeAmo RuhIsrail I missed your first comment, but my sister's right. This is a late 17th century pirate flag flown by a nut on our family tree. He actually had letters of marque to raid French slave fort with another privateer when he turned pirate. Other ship got side tracked by a storm and he sold the crew on the idea of going to the Red Sea to raid Arab traders who at the time sailed unarmed carrying goods from the orient.

  22. Jamie Patrice says:

    I remember being in a cracker barrell restroom and two white women stopped me and said "wow isn't she pretty for a black girl"

  23. Now a days it's very subtle.

  24. Gia Shakur says:

    look up the origin of the word nigger. its derived from a kemet word meaning of/belonging/or child of god. another incidence of white people taking our culture and flipping it against us.

  25. Gia Shakur says:

    look up the origin of the word nigger. its derived from a kemet word meaning of/belonging/or child of god. another incidence of white people taking our culture and flipping it against us.

  26. Gia Shakur says:

    good for you for adhearing to your white privilege. thumbs up. cake for you.

  27. Lori Shoup says:

    I also don't see it as being a " white privilege". I just think it is something that anyone, no matter the race, should be able to say without being seen as a racist.

  28. Just last night, I was sitting in a cafe and a guy I know (vaguely) said something that started with "I'm not racist, but…" I pointed out how pretty much every time someone says that, they follow it with something racist. I have never understood why white people think they are so special. I love my family and am proud of my heritage, but that sense of superiority is completely unjustified – just an excuse to remain unconscious and unaccountable. And way too uptight.

  29. Nothing like a handsome black man that can speak and write well…That may be a little racist…but it's not out of hatred…it's simply a joy and sexy and all that good stuff..lol..lol.. Well said Mr. Simon..

  30. I say that last one a lot… but I'm a hairdresser and say it to pretty much everybody. ;P

  31. Deni Nichols says:

    Steve Beinart , I agree, we act as if its term of endearment. Some of the things mentioned here, I have been subjected to by more Blacks than whites or any other race for that matter. So my questions is…are we checking everyone that makes statements such as these?

  32. Deni Nichols says:

    Steve Beinart , I agree, we act as if its term of endearment. Some of the things mentioned here, I have been subjected to by more Blacks than whites or any other race for that matter. So my questions is…are we checking everyone that makes statements such as these?

  33. Errol Smith says:

    i don't care what colour you are.. use the N word to me and see what happens

  34. Marsha Boyer says:

    Steve Beinart , there is no reason to say it

  35. Marsha Boyer says:

    lol, your not expecting us to do that any time soon are you 😉

  36. Marsha Boyer says:

    someone starting a conversation with '' i'm not racist, is a dead give away

  37. Marsha Boyer says:

    no one is born a racist, its learned, to me, a racist is someone who is depriving a village of their idiot,

  38. Marsha Boyer says:

    i have never thought nor was i raised thinking i was superior to anyone, and yes i'm white, so don't lump us all together,

  39. Sharon Walker Or not! What's subtle about calling the first African-American President a lie during a nationally televised speech and nothing is done about it? Why wasn't that person escorted out of the meeting?

  40. Brian White says:

    Many years ago, I was travelling through Virginia with a friend. He had some black friends in Leesburg that he wanted to visit. He introduced me as 'Whitey'. A young woman's jaw dropped and she asked me "You mean I can call you Whitey anytime I want to?". Yep, it's my nickname, use it whenever you want. She still couldn't believe I wasn't upset. We had a great time the 3 days we hung out together.

  41. Firoz Chatur says:

    Everyday petty rasism goes both ways….im pesonally brought up in eastleigh and got used to words like wazungu, waafrica, wasomali and waindi which could have been positiv and nagative

  42. Marsha Boyer I didn't but to deny that statement is just plain "in denial."

  43. I was told by my grandparents that, this is what we eat as our fore fathers did. Why? Because it was what was left over after the "Massa" got all he wanted off the animals. So to survive this is what they cooked up and made it into a meal Seasoned with spices and rotted vegetables or hides. Wahtever the case may or may not be I happen to like the heritage and the food! As now these foods are used in celebration of our ancestors. What's better than "SOUL" food to feed ones spiritual self! You can google that to learn more about "soulfood" and it's heritage, interesting read!

  44. Jacqueline McGee Smith Personally, I think it is ignorant for anybody to use it. Yes I understand Why blacks say it to each other, and others can't but, the history of it, really isn't helped by ignorantly lightening it. I tend to be a conspiracy Theorist, but I almost wonder, if it really wasn't some white guy at the top of Appearance of Black people, to make it trendy. Like BET is owned by a White guy. Russell Simons starts all kinds of things, soullessly, just to sell to a white guy, exploiting not just Blacks but all of the lower classes regardless of race.
    I am white, so I'm not allowed to use it. But being quite eclectic I also understand the ease of it. I agree with the Tribe Called Quest song, it's as catchy as an ooh-wap.
    I personally; regardless that my desire context of use, would be the same as Blacks, I rather not support the ignorance, and face it, it's a threat to me life: have trained myself to use "Common" in it's place. It may not catch on, but it works for me. Depending on it's context and inflection, you can tell someone they are low, by "You're just a Common." or you express a kinship: "What's up Common?"

  45. Eric Coyle says:

    How is calling someone articulate racist?

  46. Marsha Boyer I didn't, but to deny the statement is "in denial"

  47. Curious so just a question, it's certainly a free world, but how did so many Euro descent people even become curious of this site?

  48. Novi Guyton says:

    You know what is worse… hearing another Black person say "Why do you sound white?" …. very sad.

  49. Anonymous says:

    Marsha Boyer : I too am white nor do I feel superior to anyone else. It is possible to like and admire Black People and not look at them at being so very different.

  50. Anonymous says:

    They speak American English, not necessarily correct English.

  51. Marsha Boyer: I didn't. But denying that statement is "in denial."

  52. Azaria Burton says:

    Calling someone articulate is not racist except for when you are only shocked by how articulate they are because they are black and you can't believe that they don't speak ebonics.

  53. Farzana Yusuf says:

    Bara bara che??

  54. Lisa Brains says:

    When I moved south I heard that from white people too, even though I did not sound the least bit southern. I remember thinking everyone, regardless of race, sounding the same when I first got here. It took me a while to catch on to the accent.

  55. I don't like it when WHITE FOLKS state I WISH WE COULD GO BACK TO THE OLD DAYS. Whos old days when Blacks knew there place in Whita USA. I have a women say to me she could not find a girl to clean her house because everyone is so educated now.

  56. I don't like it when WHITE FOLKS state I WISH WE COULD GO BACK TO THE OLD DAYS. Whos old days when Blacks knew there place in Whita USA. I have a women say to me she could not find a girl to clean her house because everyone is so educated now.

  57. Gerald King says:

    Yeah this is thecountry of freedom of speech and yeah youcan sayod call me a nigger bjg also note that im gonna beat the shit ouf of you

  58. Elizabeth Valerie Sowell says:

    I can't stand the "you're pretty for a dark-skinned girl". My response, "You're talkative for an insignificant speck". If you're going to compliment me just say I stood out to you because now I assume you're a (insert insult here) with myopic beauty standards.

    *Yes, I'm aware it's wrong to assume

  59. Laura Arata says:

    the "you people' thing isnt about when one is addressing a bunch of folks, ( all though what's wrong with saying all of you, or everyone, or whatever the situation calls for).
    but its talking about when one white person is speaking to one person of color. It is something white pple say, and it is then followed by some generalization about all people of color ( or a particular color)
    Like, 'you people are so good at sports' or "why do you people always…' straights do this to gays, christians to jews…. when this happens to you, you suddenly realize that the person talking to you doesnt see you as an person at all.
    Apparently this is something you have had the Priviledge of never experiencing.
    Besides, its not about learning some things you 'arent allowed to say' its about realizing what they mean and why you are saying them.
    signed, a white person

  60. As for the last one, I'd prefer someone ask so I can say no(or not depending on the person) rather then just assuming they can and going ahead.

  61. Janis Proctor says:

    PREACH. I've had near all of these said to me and was always surprised by how downright racist people will be to your face. It's insanity.

  62. I haven't read this yet…
    But I wanna know first…
    Is askin' to touch one's fro offensive?
    I've never felt one!!!

  63. I haven't read this yet…
    But I wanna know first…
    Is askin' to touch one's fro offensive?
    I've never felt one!!!

  64. Elizabeth Valerie Sowell says:

    Oh. My. Goodness. YES.

  65. Elizabeth Valerie Sowell says:

    @Sean: It's more inappropriate to me than racist but I have had random strangers pull my fro to either see if it was real or because they've never felt my kind of hair texture before. By the way, the never asked permission.

  66. Elizabeth Valerie Sowell Well I'd obviously ask first.
    xD

  67. Elizabeth Valerie Sowell says:

    Hopefully, you'll ask someone you know rather than a complete stranger. Sometimes the question is really creepy in spite of the fact it's only out of curiosity.

  68. Camille Jet-Lynx Udunno says:

    I hate it when anyone uses the N-word, black or white. No matter who says it, it's derogatory. It's like women calling each other the B-word. It's not loving, it's not friendly and if you call me either under any context, prepare for an Arctic chill.

  69. Heidi Causey says:

    I love the feel of black people hair.., specially in dreads…. I always ask, well depending on if i want to or not. However, you say yes once you can't revoke my privileges lol.

  70. Heidi Causey says:

    I love the feel of black people hair.., specially in dreads…. I always ask, well depending on if i want to or not. However, you say yes once you can't revoke my privileges lol.

  71. Heidi Causey says:

    If I want to touch their hair that is. That's when I ask.

  72. Heidi Causey I guess I'll have to be sure not to tell you yes then if I'm not allowed to revoke that privilege if I'm not feeling it one day.

  73. Heidi Causey says:

    Understandable, but considering…

  74. "Can I touch your hair," really? As though white people don't ever get asked that question?

    And isn't the implication that somebody is only saying you sound articulate because you're black kind of racist on your part in the first place? Maybe you're just genuinely well-spoken?

  75. Janis Proctor says:

    Sean M. Bowen I think it mostly depends on the person. Just ask a good friend and do your best to be polite about it and explain why. Also, don't shout out that it feels like patting the sheep.

  76. Well that's (no offense intended) common sense… 😛

  77. Elizabeth Valerie Sowell says:

    I think the author is coming from a place where it's more inappropriate but it can have a racial undertone (like people who think I should be honored at the fact they want to touch my hair and just because they've never seen it before they think I'm a walking petting zoo). And as for the being articulate, most people (that I come/came across) said that to me because they had the assumption that Blacks didn't speak well and they were surprised and made a huge deal out of it. I guess my point is "articulate" in this context is exclusive to Whites and, believe me, it gets annoying after awhile.

  78. I don't get the "can I touch your hair" one. The only reason I could see someone asking is if they have never seen hair like that in person and are curios about what it's like. Hair is hair isn't it? do random strangers just touch your hair without asking, or seem offended when they ask and you say "no". I am white but I've had friends ask to touch my hair all the time. if there is something I'm missing, please let me know.

  79. Anyone can say anything they want yet that doesn't mean there won't be consequences to what they say.

  80. Anyone can say anything they want yet that doesn't mean there won't be consequences to what they say.

  81. John Kenyon says:

    Yes. Ask my bi-racial, Puerto Rican raised children! Now in the USA many white people ask to touch their hair. Whether it is innocent or not, my children respond with conflicted emotions. Culture shock. In PR they were just folks–aside from the north south issue. Good question.

  82. Eugenio Yolanda Martinez-Rodriguez says:

    Just know Hispanics go through similar comments that make you think what rock have you been under….. comments such as, "I did not know Hispanics had freckles", or " you are so light skin, is one of your parents white", and the person saying it feels they paid you a complement.

  83. How does one sound white?

  84. Our hair defy's gravity and grows up towards the sun like all living things, why would you buy some diseased dead hair and wear it on your head? Mops are for cleaning floors not to be worn.

  85. Gene Curry says:

    I don't tolerate ANYONE calling me the "N" word. It's derogatory no matter who uses it ! Why so many Black Americans have come to accept it from one another is sad. The word is despicable no matter how it's used. To accept being called the "N" word means you have no problem being labeled what racists named us. Wake Up People and think higher of yourself !

  86. Gene Curry says:

    Azoil Kallitechnis Strigidae : Well Stated… Thank You !

  87. Scott Allen says:

    Really, you're in denial and are an apologist for the obvious. wishing you well!

  88. Scott Allen says:

    Really, you're in denial and are an apologist for the obvious. wishing you well!

  89. Michelle Froelick Young says:

    Yikes! I feel bad now!!!! An acquaintance of mine, who is black, gave an awesome speech the other day. I approached her afterward and told her I admired her public speaking skills and asked if she had attended a class on public speaking. Also, one of the children at the child care center I work at came in with an incredibly intricate hair style. I was in awe, and asked her mother how she did it. I was genuinely curious in both cases. I hope now I did not sound racist!!! If so, I feel horrible!!! I did not mean my questions in any other way but admiration. ( especially since public speaking makes me nauseous and a ponytail is my hair styling limit!!!) 🙂

  90. Michelle Froelick Young says:

    Yikes! I feel bad now!!!! An acquaintance of mine, who is black, gave an awesome speech the other day. I approached her afterward and told her I admired her public speaking skills and asked if she had attended a class on public speaking. Also, one of the children at the child care center I work at came in with an incredibly intricate hair style. I was in awe, and asked her mother how she did it. I was genuinely curious in both cases. I hope now I did not sound racist!!! If so, I feel horrible!!! I did not mean my questions in any other way but admiration. ( especially since public speaking makes me nauseous and a ponytail is my hair styling limit!!!) 🙂

  91. Trish Landers Bower says:

    I'm sure that both people took into account that you seemed genuinely curious and not meaning any sort of condescension.

  92. Gail Hurst says:

    I just had someone address me as "you people" commenting on a post. I could not complete any dialogue with her and informed her of such. "You people" means the N – word when said by someone not of my ethnicity and the conversation concerns race.

  93. I feel you on that but some of you make me sick.because you sound like some of y'all true your nostril.as if you trying to out speak the white man. Just fake some of y'all same black even start clutching your perse n beap you car alam when you see a black man some of y'all even make fun of us when we try to hold on go any of our African identity. Some of y'all just fake as fuck.

  94. I feel you on that but some of you make me sick.because you sound like some of y'all true your nostril.as if you trying to out speak the white man. Just fake some of y'all same black even start clutching your perse n beap you car alam when you see a black man some of y'all even make fun of us when we try to hold on go any of our African identity. Some of y'all just fake as fuck.

  95. Some of y'all talk true you nostril.you sound like a bicycle horn.

  96. I alway confront then n this subject. Because they clams that black people is lazy. N here we go with you want to go back to the good old days when nigger was doing all there work for free. Not that they would ill treat us when they ready. Is that the days that you talking about?

  97. I alway confront then n this subject. Because they clams that black people is lazy. N here we go with you want to go back to the good old days when nigger was doing all there work for free. Not that they would ill treat us when they ready. Is that the days that you talking about?

  98. Why does Facebook like to fuckup our wards when they don't like what we are talking about. Not only that they would ill treat us when they ready.

  99. Patrick Tyrone Hightower says:

    Wanda Lightford Everhart YES and NOW everybody is jumping on bandwagon!

  100. Patrick Tyrone Hightower says:

    Wanda Lightford Everhart YES and NOW everybody is jumping on bandwagon!

  101. Patrick Tyrone Hightower says:

    Deni Nichols OH here we go with its the BLACKS!

  102. Patrick Tyrone Hightower says:

    Deni Nichols OH here we go with its the BLACKS!

  103. Patrick Tyrone Hightower says:

    John Kenyon just a q? how are they bi racial PR??

  104. Patrick Tyrone Hightower says:

    John Kenyon just a q? how are they bi racial PR??

  105. I heard every one of those statements, except the dark skinned girl one (only because I'm a boy).

  106. Jenelle Perfectimperfection says:

    I've heard the "you're pretty for a dark girl and can I touch your hair"( & a stranger touched my hair without my permission & told me in front of my 7yr old son who has hair issues, I'm not all black because black women have short knotty hair) I've been told I speak clearly, I was inboxed by a racist stranger on FB stating they weren't talking about blacks like me & they hope they didn't offend me, then they sent me a friend request. On my PRN job I had a family member say I spoke well to be from Baltimore & I didn't act like I was from the city. I was written up for telling them slavery ended 120 yrs before I was born. The Civil rights movement ended about 20 yrs before I was born. And black people now graduate high school and go on to college, which I did. Why wouldn't I speak well? The most offensive thing is when White men don't have a problem with me because "im not ghetto, im educated, I work & im not like the stereotypically black women." But, they really dislike black people who dont fit their mold of what they think we should be. As a black women who can switch her "ghettoness" on and off I get to hear these offensive statements a lot.

  107. Jenelle Perfectimperfection says:

    I've heard the "you're pretty for a dark girl and can I touch your hair"( & a stranger touched my hair without my permission & told me in front of my 7yr old son who has hair issues, I'm not all black because black women have short knotty hair) I've been told I speak clearly, I was inboxed by a racist stranger on FB stating they weren't talking about blacks like me & they hope they didn't offend me, then they sent me a friend request. On my PRN job I had a family member say I spoke well to be from Baltimore & I didn't act like I was from the city. I was written up for telling them slavery ended 120 yrs before I was born. The Civil rights movement ended about 20 yrs before I was born. And black people now graduate high school and go on to college, which I did. Why wouldn't I speak well? The most offensive thing is when White men don't have a problem with me because "im not ghetto, im educated, I work & im not like the stereotypically black women." But, they really dislike black people who dont fit their mold of what they think we should be. As a black women who can switch her "ghettoness" on and off I get to hear these offensive statements a lot.

  108. Kaisha DocLoveless Hemphill says:

    Yeah, that has to be irritating. What I get a lot of is "You're not black, You're too light and your hair is too pretty for you to be black" WTF SInce when did any of that matter when America has its 1 drop rule?

  109. Valerie Johnson says:

    Diana Betonselfalways Thomas so you need to objectify and sexualize him?

  110. Valerie Johnson says:

    Sean M. Bowen if you have to ask, of course it is. But you knew that didn't you?
    lack of boundaries intruding into folks person and personal space.

  111. Valerie Johnson says:

    Sean M. Bowen Sean M. Bowen if you have to ask, of course it is. But you knew that didn't you?
    lack of boundaries intruding into folks person and personal space.
    The lack of boundaries is the racist part. Would they feel free to touch a random white person's hair without asking?

  112. Valerie Johnson says:

    Kaisha DocLoveless Hemphill too pretty to be black? Wow loaded isn't it

  113. Valerie Johnson says:

    Why write you up instead of the Ass who made the statements. And btw black folks have been graduating from college and High School or educated in equivalent ways since this countries inception.

  114. Valerie Johnson says:

    Hugues Fontenellepretty thick aren't you?

  115. Jenelle Perfectimperfection says:

    Valerie because white is right on my prn job. And we are not supposed to say anything back. They have pics of slaves on the wall.

  116. Kaisha DocLoveless Hemphill says:

    Valerie Johnson that statement was about my hair, not me. I never understood the whole "good hair" comment that gets made. Hair is hair. I just find it very offensive when someone says things like, "You're very articulate you cant be from Baltimore, You're well mannered, your mom must be white." As if an African American cannot possess these traits.

  117. Valerie Johnson says:

    Mind Bird part of communicating well is saying things in a respectful manner so that you can be heard and so that you convey the intended message. You come off as intellectually limited and a bit lazy. You know what the connotations are and think it is okay to use inappropriate terminology. That makes you appear to be unsavvy and a bit of a fool.

  118. Valerie Johnson says:

    you should've said " I would say you were rude for a white woman but…actually you are typical of YOU PEOPLE"

  119. Jenelle Perfectimperfection says:

    I just had a black woman tell me I was jealous of her because im dark and she was light. She called me a monkey too. Because I don't acknowledge my grandparents race. And Kaisha u know I love the skin im in and dark men too

  120. Valerie Johnson says:

    Patrick Tyrone Hightower biracial means having two parents who are not of the same race – genetically. Puerto Rican means being of Puerto Rican heritage. Yo can be white, black, or asian and from Puerto Rico. ( all native americans from PR were exterminated) Being biracial means any mixture of two of the three.

  121. Kaisha DocLoveless Hemphill says:

    Jenelle Perfectimperfection You know I know! lol The one thing that got said to me when I was in College getting my degree in Forensic science was , " How can you afford to be at this University, Financial Aid Cannot possibly pay your tuition?" Little did they know that I already had a very lucrative career and paid my tuition myself because I made too much to receive financial aid. I guess these people were under the assumption that I was a poor black woman who couldnt afford to pay for her own education at a Univeristy out of her own pocket

  122. Valerie Johnson says:

    Jenelle Perfectimperfection ridiculous I am so thankful that I know longer have to work with a majority white crew. But I still have to deal with ignorant crap from one white supervisor and blacks who don't challenge it and let it slide.

  123. Valerie Johnson says:

    Jenelle Perfectimperfection insidious racism permeates on all levels and too many of us have internalized it.

  124. Jenelle Perfectimperfection says:

    Valerie I'm luck my FT job Isn't like that.

  125. I'm white and have had that question asked of me its human nature to be curious

  126. Valerie Johnson says:

    Anthony Thomas I guess if a woman say yes to sex one day, she is not raped if a person revokes the privilege, says no and is forced to have sex. smdh… isms

  127. Austen Brent Williams says:

    Lol I've been told I don't sound black.. I'm very well spoken. But I can act a fool if necessary

  128. Austen Brent Williams says:

    Lol I've been told I don't sound black.. I'm very well spoken. But I can act a fool if necessary

  129. Austen Brent Williams says:

    Well said

  130. Indigo Bey says:

    The best one I did not let get by me was: "I'm nit racist…hell, we grew up with a black family on our block AND their son was our high school quarterback! You call THAT racist?!" My reply: "No dude, I call YOU racist."

  131. Perhaps I actually believe that some people listen past "you people" to the rest of the sentence, in which it is clear what group I am defining and speaking of. I see your chip is solidly placed, and I hope that works for you.

  132. I know that racism exists. As a Black woman, (and dark skinned to boot!) I have experienced racism and will most likely continue to. It is has been globally woven into the fabric of societies. But we must also be aware of the racism that exists in Black Culture. Familiar with the term "color struck"? – a form of Black racism that takes the form of Black people favoring people of their own race who are light skinned. Case in point the comment, "You are pretty for a dark skinned girl". I dare anyone to say that those comments have never been made (specifically by Black men to dark skinned Black women). I can tell you, I have heard it from Black men. I feel sorry for them, because their self-hatred, and shame is so evident in their denial of the obvious – they too, are Black (and dark skinned). Over the centuries, Black people have been psychologically primed to engage in obscure forms of self-hatred. Here is but one example – and there are more.

    Consequently, if we are to rid the world of racism, we must first begin with ourselves in our own communities. We must love ourselves for who we are – celebrate the diversity that exists within our culture, educate each other – VOTE! Participate in social and political discourse that changes the conversation so that these comments not longer have meaning because we have mastered the ability to be strong in the face of racism. Once we have accomplished these goals- then racist statements will mean nothing – merely water rolling off our backs. As far as I am concerned comments such as these are mere distractions – sticks and stones, honey – sticks and stones!

  133. Laura Arata says:

    Sean M. Bowen ( fellow white person here) Assuming you and the person with the fro arent REALLY close friends, Yeah it usually is. I have seen it happen and it creeps Me out because it feels like the white person, however 'innocently' is treating my black friend like an Oddity on display or something. like, 'The world is mine, as a white person, and You are an interesting object in it'. And, there Are apparently enough white people who feel completely free to touch a black persons head without asking, I can't think of a black woman I know who hasnt had it happen. That has Got to get old. there Are other issues involved, hair is a loaded issue, race wise.
    would you ask a white amputee to touch his stump, cause you never felt one before? Or if you'd never seen a beard, would you ask to touch that?
    and if you have never 'touched a black persons hair before, it is because we have a ridiculously segregated society. in other words, a result of racism in the first place, and it just doesn't seem like every black individuals job to provide you with that oh so important experience of which you have been deprived as a result of racism. What if you just Don't ask, and put that experience of wanting something that a racist world wont let you have into a little perspective.

  134. Laura Arata says:

    most likely your meaning came across in context. whatever the case case, now you have more knowlege than before. I dont think we white people should be so touchy and hear this kind of thing as "words we are not allowed to say" acdcept this sort of info as a gift of knowlege from a perspective you could never have,. Use it as an opportunity to check yourself if you feel inclined to say one of these things. we all learn as we go along.

  135. Laura Arata says:

    MB, hwite here, and I dont see any chips on my shoulders. First I'd like to suggest that you reread Gails First post, where she Specifies the context of 'you people' that shge is talking about. Secondly i'd ask you to consider this:
    Whenever you say 'you people' when you are speaking to one person, you are tarring him /her with the same brush ( intentional reference) as a whole group of people that you assign to him/her. whether it's black folks of Christians, or gays, or i dunno, short folks. you disrespect my individuality when you imply that you know all about me, cuz you know how "you people" think. It is unquestionably a generalization.
    It has been directed at me as a member of a different minority, so in those instances it obviously didn't mean 'the n word' But in Gails experience that is exactl;y what it meant. whenever you hear a white person use that phrase to a black person i defy you to say it means anything else.
    While Of Course, no one is trying to say the use of those words is forever prohibited.
    Instead of seeing a chip, how about allowing yourself to be educated to the fact that this phrase has a significant history of being used in a sneering manner particularly by whites to blacks. just like "you are articulate' of course it can simply mean you think the speaker is articulate. But 1) check yourself , are you really thinking " wow you are articulate for a black person?(all of us have stereotypes put into our brains from a very young age. frankly whenever someone says to me "I am not racist" I Already know they
    have a Very poor understanding of what racism is.that's just me.)
    and 2) how about instead of telling people what they should get over, you HEar what they are telling you is their experience and avoid what you now know to be at best Un helpful speech?

  136. Laura Arata says:

    see my post above. just like y'all sounds 'hillbilly' to you (by the way, ask poor white folks of certain regions how they feel about That term)
    Now you know that especially when used in certain situations can sound racist to a lot of folks.
    Why? because it has been and still is often used that way. Now you know, you can make your choices.

  137. Laura Arata says:

    Marsha Boyer lol "dont lump us all together"? you mean 'don't say you people think you are superior?' LOL
    and who said he meant all white people?

  138. In a discussion, the following exchange may occur:
    Alpha–I eat meat. A lot of people eat meat and think it's okay.
    Beta–You people (who believe this) are wrong, because….etc.
    I will not give up my language-given right to use this simple construction. It's a floating non-specific reference to whatever group is holding the belief one is discussing. I know racists talk in code, but this phrase is just too ordinary to count as that. There is nothing, nothing, nothing about this phrase that is reserved to use for or to African-American people, and I don't tar anyone with anything ever.

  139. Laura Arata says:

    Mind Bird I absolutely agree with your clear explanation of that correct, appropriate and harmless use of the phrase in that specific context. Again, no one is saying the phrase should be struck from the english langusge.understood, acknowleged, accepted. Now, I hope you can move beyond that, and see if you can allow yourself to try to understand what people are trying to tell you."nothing nothing nothing " except the experience of enough people to have it appear on this list.

  140. I believe you are saying that the following exchange might occur:
    Alpha, who is African-American: A lot of people eat meat and think it's okay.
    Beta, who is European-American: You people are wrong. Meat-eatng is bad because…etc.
    Alpha, to themselves: what a racist!
    I have tried this on one European-American, who has confirmed the point of view of the article and yourself. Apparently my use of this has gone unremarked by anyone because I am long-winded and by the time I stop talking everyone knows what I meant, but I want a larger sample group.

  141. Gail Hurst says:

    Mind Bird, I say you are arrogant, you say I have a chip on my shoulder. Neither you or I are experts on this subject. We both have differing opinions. However, you seem very angry and hate filled. With a different tone, I could better appreciate your post.

  142. Terry Moore says:

    Force-feeding unhealthy foods, but I bet you eat sushi. Black folk, we really don't need whites to hate us, if they only realized. Of all of the crazy things that people eat, I guess Chitterlings are the worse. Oh, but you sound so intelligent, ugh!

  143. Alex Dahl says:

    No one can make you feel inferior without your concent

  144. I live in SA, and feel the hate through the media like the press, facebook etc. Get on with it dude. We are different in appearance, build, culturally. But we can have good times together. We whities look at Germans as :Tjermans jawohl, Portuguese as "Porras". I support the Springboks and "hate" the All Blacks rugby team. Because they won the World cup What needs to stop is comparing, and the racism thing will go away.

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