Homeopathic Treatment Can Fight Alzheimer’s Disease

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alzheimer disease

A huge discovery in the natural treatment of Alzheimer’s disease was recently reported at the Neuroscience Conference in Washington by the National Center for Homeopathy. Homeopathic manufacturer and research organization, Heel, presented studies on a multi-target, combination homeopathic medicine that has proven effective for both relieving symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease and influencing the reduction of the formation of amyloid plaques in the brains of patients. In-vitro and in-vivo studies were conducted in France and Finland, and confirm that subjects showed enhanced learning abilities, an increase in their ability to recognize objects, and improvement in memory performance after treatment.

Classical homeopathy also offers patients hope. Classical homeopathy uses one remedy at a time, and may take a similar multi-targeted approach to treating Alzheimer’s; however, the practitioner may either alternate or use several remedies in succession rather than combining them. The announcement from Heel allows people, who wouldn’t otherwise seek homeopathic treatment, to feel more confident of its efficacy.

What is Alzheimer’s Disease?

Alzheimer’s is an affliction of the brain causing the gradual deterioration of brain cells that result in the loss of memory, cognitive abilities and intelligence. The disease afflicts primarily the elderly and symptoms are often seen as early as the late 40s. Alzheimer’s is the primary cause of dementia, a decline in brain performance, thinking skills and reasoning. The disease is caused by two abnormalities including neurofibrillary tangles (or bunches of altered proteins inside brain cells) and amyloid plaques (or fragments of proteins forming outside the brain cells).

Symptoms and Presentation

Alzheimer’s most common early symptom is memory loss. Progressing age is the common denominator in the development of the disease, bringing difficulties in thinking, reasoning, communication and forgetfulness. Patients feel lost in familiar places and are unable to recognize their family members and friends. Loss of words, the ability to speak, and loss of judgment also characterize this disease. Additionally, patients may experience personality changes, becoming suspicious, angry, fearful, moody and highly dependent on family members and caretakers.

Read more at Natural News.