Peter Sarsgaard Cast In 'The Killing' Season 3

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It’s official – Not only will The Killing be back for season 3, but Peter Sarsgaard will be the villain to go with it.

Sarsgaard will play death row inmate, Tom Seward, on the new season. According to The Hollywood Reporter, his character is a longtime criminal, living in and out of prison his entire life for various violent crimes. He’s anything but easy to deal with and his connection to the case should be an interesting and challenging one. This marks Sarsgaard’s first recurring role on a TV series.

AMC initially announced that The Killing was to be, well, killed  after the second season. The network then had a change of heart and decided to let the show live. Mireille Enos will reprise her role as Sarah Linden, a sullen and dedicated detective. She’ll be back with a brand new partner, played by Elias Koteas (The Curious Case of Benjamin Button, Shutter Island). Don’t fret Stephen Holder fans, Linden’s former partner, played by Joel Kinnaman, will also return – just in a different capacity. Amy Seimetz and Max Fowler also join the cast as a mother whose daughter is missing and a streetwise, tech saavy troubled teen, respectively. The new season picks up a year after the Rosie Larsen case was solved, when Linden is drawn back into a similar case.

The Killing had mixed reviews after its first two seasons. Many viewers were outraged when the show failed to reveal who actually killed Rosie Larsen at the end of the first season. Instead the mystery was dragged out for an entire second season. This forced viewers to watch 13 hours of The Killing, to then have to wait 13 more hours to find out who really killed Rosie. This infuriated so many fans that ratings notably dipped for the second season. Angry watchers took to Twitter and various forms of social media bashing the show for dragging on so long. We live in a world of instant gratification where it usually only takes one 45-minute episode to figure out whodunnit on other mystery / detective based shows, such as Law and Order and CSI. In theory, the drawn out series allows for more character development, a somewhat realistic timeline, more details of the case, and  hypothetically more hype for the show. Unfortunately, if this is just going to drive off loyal viewers perhaps listening to what fans want this time around will bode better for The Killing.