Translate »
ArabicChinese (Traditional)EnglishFrenchHaitianPortugueseSpanishSwahili
ArabicChinese (Traditional)EnglishFrenchHaitianPortugueseSpanishSwahili
Thursday, August 28th, 2014

6 Issues Black Professionals Face in The Workplace

blacks-professionals-isolated

Nepotism and White Privilege 

Structural racism and sexism within society has meant that opportunities to gain access to the “right” schools or professions has been closed to the majority of people of color for generations. Although recent gains in education and professional advancement have made rising to the top possible for some minorities and women, it is nevertheless difficult for them to create the connections needed to enter the highest levels of management.

Pages: 1 2 3 4 5 6

Comments

  1. I sometimes find it fascinating that people of color might somehow fail to consider that they (we) represent the product of a process that sought to deny freedom, justice and equality because of the color of one's skin for 10 generations. Yes, it is a country founded on freedoms, but we ensured that freedom by providing support to institutions which, by their own standards, would consume smaller fish (companies) if given the chance. The real question ought to be how can African Americans and other victims of suppression change the standards of excellence. Perhaps by turning them on their sides. Far too many people direct their displeasure at what the larger society is doing to them. I should think that with the dot com failures, the economic depression of the 2000's (capped in 2008), and the pressures brought from the instability of mythology – such a globalism – the real challenge ought to be how we center ourselves while striving to position our futures to not get sucked into the abyss, knowing that the winds that cometh proceed to blow. Said differently, Harriet Tubman commented: I carried 1000 men and women to freedom, and would have carried 1000 more, if I could have convinced them that they were still slaves.

Speak Your Mind