Chicago HS Student Gets Accepted to 23 HBCUs, Offered $300K In Scholarships

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Ariyana Davis is a second-generation college student. (Ariyana Davis Facebook)

Fresh off the heels of another case of #BlackGirlMagic, a Chicago High School student’s smart application submission led her to be accepted 23 historically Black colleges and universities.

Ariyana Davis is an 18-year-old senior at Chicago’s Mother McAuley Liberal Arts High School and she used the Common Black College Application to apply to the nearly two dozen HBCUs that ultimately accepted her, ABC News reported. Students can use the platform to apply to any number of the 50-member institutions in CBCA’s database for only $35.

The massive acceptance rate made Davis feel “excited and overjoyed,” she told the news outlet.

Davis’ school acceptances include Spelman College in Atlanta and a 24th one in Charleston, Ill. — Eastern Illinois University, a predominantly white institution.

“It was important for me to go to an institution that feels like home,” Davis told ABC News of attending an HBCU, noting “they are known for producing successful Black professionals.”

Davis’ good fortune also came in the form of scholarship funds as a total of $300,000 in offers flooded in from every school she applied to, for which she felt “grateful.”

To prepare for completing her applications, Davis took advantage of college preparatory courses offered during her lunch period. She also gave credit to her learning resources teacher, Julianne Alvarado, for being there for her over the past four years.

“I’ve seen her grow and change and mature and now that she has this goal for after high school … she went for it,” Alvarado said to ABC. “She’s very well organized and follows through with things.”

Davis revealed she has officially decided to attend Alcorn State University in Mississippi in the fall and will major in accounting.

“I love the family-oriented environment and close-knit community and the opportunity they will provide to me when I join the honors courses,” she said.

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