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Wednesday, September 10th, 2014

50 Cent Leads ‘Dream School’ Series Targeting High School Dropouts

Dream School features 50 cent, Swizz Beats as instructors Rapper 50 Cent is taking on the role of executive producer of a new unscripted series, “Dream School,” which will target dropouts or students who have been expelled. Placing them in an unconventional learning environment designed to motivate, the show will give reluctant learners a second chance at a quality education.

The reality program got its start in the U.K. and proved to be such a touching documentary series that creator, Jamie Oliver, is ready to debut it in the U.S.

Dream School will reach out to 15 expelled or unmotivated students, attempting to ignite their intellectual curiosity and provide them opportunities they otherwise wouldn’t have.

The instructors of the school are nothing short of what any student would consider a dream team of teachers who will cover a range of subject matters including music, politics, film, and science.

Among the “Dream School” instructors are mega-producer Swizz Beats; TV journalist Soledad O’Brien; astronaut Mae Jemison; filmmaker Oliver Stone; and even civil rights activist Jesse Jackson.

It’s no surprise that 50 Cent wanted to be a part of the project, considering the fact that he didn’t graduate high school.

50 Cent, whose real name is Curtis Jackson, was expelled from school for possession of drugs and forced to earn his GED from jail. So when this opportunity came his way, he wanted to use his fame to inspire.

“It’s an opportunity to utilize your celebrity and influence in a positive way,” he told theGrio.com. “Jamie Oliver’s people reached out to me, and the show was previously a success. I knew it would be a success here also.”

He also explained why the unconventional school will probably connect with the students more effectively than a traditional classroom setting.

“I think it’s easier to receive messages that are not traditional, especially if it’s someone that’s an icon or someone that’s familiar in pop culture,” he explained. “It allows the kids to not be blocked by feeling like this person doesn’t actually understand or doesn’t relate to what’s going on at the moment.”

The U.S. version of the series debuts today at 10/9c on the Sundance Channel.

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