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Thursday, December 18th, 2014

G-Boom Bluetooth Speaker Solid As Portable Listening Device

g-boom speakerWith portable sound, you usually get what you pay for. Is that true for the G-Boom, a ruggedized Bluetooth boombox that sells for a mere $100? Let’s give it a listen.

If you like to take your tunes with you for partying al fresco, you’re looking for the biggest possible sound in the smallest possible container. Outdoorsy types are hoping such a device will resist the harsh elements, and hold up well to accidental bumps and dings. Take one look at the G-Boom, and then give it a serious listen, and you’ll soon notice that this device accommodates both needs.

It’s not waterproof, but its controls can resist the occasional bit of water. The USB and auxiliary ports in the back are covered with a rubber flap, preventing water damage there, too. That cover probably can’t keep a submerged G-Boom out of serious trouble, but it’ll keep a few splashes or sprinkles out of your boombox in a pinch.

I think this product’s designers have reached a happy medium with this product. They’ve somehow shoehorned two 3-inch full-range speakers and a pair of 1-inch dome tweeters into this compact case that’s about a foot wide, all driven by two 9-Watt amplifiers.

If you’re going on an outdoor excursion with musical accompaniment from the G-boom, you’ll be glad to know that there is a rechargeable lithium-ion battery nestled inside that can power this baby for about 6 hours.

When using battery power, this little sucker pumps out the serious sound just as well as when it’s plugged in. Assisted by a couple of bass ports in the back, you’d never guess the source of that rocking bass you hear is from a device that’s a mere 10.2 inches tall and 4.9 inches deep.

Therein lies the miracle of ducted port bass technology, optimized by the design chops of Matthew Paprocki, G-Project’s creative director as well as the brains behind the highly regarded Soundfreaq line of portable Bluetooth devices. No question, the guy knows how to extract the maximum sound out of small devices.

Read More: mashable.com

 

 

 

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