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Saturday, November 22nd, 2014

Why Blacks Are More Likely to Start a Business, But Whites More Likely to Have a Successful One

Many African-Americans want to run their own businesses. Some surveys show that African-Americans are more interested in running their own businesses than whites. African-Americans are more likely to initiate the new-business creation process than whites although they are less likely to have an up-and-running business a few years later, according to the Panel Study of Entrepreneurial Dynamics, a representative survey of the adult-age population housed at the University of Michigan.

Despite entrepreneurial tendencies, African-American small-business ownership lags that of whites. White men run their own incorporated businesses at more than twice the rate of African-American men, and white women do so at more than three times the rate of their African-American counterparts, analysis by Bureau of Labor Statistics economist Steve Hipple reveals.

Policy makers have historically relied on targeted minority-lending programs when seeking ways to close this gap, but these efforts have met with limited success. Now would-be entrepreneurs can take advantage of the new equity crowdfunding legislation to try a different and potentially better solution.

Let’s take a closer look at the problem. Researchers, policy makers and social advocates point to differences in social networks, role models, education, and occupational choice as reasons that African-Americans are less likely to run their own businesses than whites.

While all of these factors no doubt matter, research by University of California at Santa Cruz economist Rob Fairlie shows that the most important factor is a difference in wealth. Because most entrepreneurs finance their businesses largely from their own savings and personal borrowing, net worth has a huge impact on whether would-be entrepreneurs can turn their new-business dreams into reality.

The typical African-American would-be entrepreneur is much poorer than the typical white one. Federal Reserve statistics show that the median African-American household had a net worth of only $15,500 in 2010, as compared to $130,600 for the typical white non-Hispanic household. Because the capital requirements to start a business are the same regardless of the would-be entrepreneur’s race, that nearly 13-fold difference in net worth means that a much smaller fraction of interested African-Americans have the money to start companies than interested whites.

Read more: Entrepreneur

Comments

  1. Floyd Brooks says:

    Pretty interesting post. However, the question is they differences in the types of businesses the various groups are trying to start. That's a very blanked like analysis. It would be helpful if you could include the BOL link. Thanks

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