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Thursday, August 14th, 2014

Floyd Mayweather, Ray J Drop $50K in Atlanta Strip Club

Floyd Mayweather Jr. lived up to his nickname—”Money”—Wednesday night when he dropped in an Atlanta strip club with Ray J. and spent $50,000 on the ladies, making it a very lucrative and rainy night at Diamonds of Atlanta, according to TMZ.

Mayweather actually carried the loot in a Louis Vuitton bag, into which he dipped throughout the night to lavish his praise on the ladies.

And judging by the pictures on TMZ, Joseline of “Love & Hip Hop Atlanta” fame was at the club. She was clothed in the picture, so it’s not clear if she was dancing. But an underlying theme of the scandalous show was whether she’ll have to go back to stripping if music producer Stevie J. turns his back on her.

Mayweather’s stripper club largesse comes on the same week as his lawyers made some moves that could open the door for Mayweather receiving probably the largest payday in boxing history—a fight against Manny Pacquiao, a fight that has been so long awaited that most fight fans had started to doubt whether it would ever happen.

Mayweather and Pacquiao agreed to settle a federal defamation casein Las Vegas, according to a lawyer involved in the matter, a move that avoids trial and clears a key hurdle to a long-awaited bout between two top fighters who’ve traded verbal jabs for years but have never met in the ring.Terms of the deal are confidential, Malcolm LaVergne, a lawyer representing Floyd Mayweather Jr.’s father in the case, told The Associated Press.Pacquiao, 33, a member of Congress in the Philippines, filed the lawsuit in December 2009 in Las Vegas. He sought unspecified damages based on allegations that Mayweather defamed him by suggesting he used performance-enhancing substances. Pacquiao denied Mayweather’s claim.

LaVergne said the various parties to the case have signed documents to be filed under seal asking U.S. District Judge Larry R. Hicks to dismiss the case. He said others involved in the case were preparing a public statement.

“The matter has been resolved,” LaVergne said. “Any alleged terms of the resolution would be strictly confidential. Floyd Mayweather Sr. is very happy that this lengthy case has finally come to a conclusion.”

The judge last week ordered Floyd Mayweather Jr. to pay about $114,000 in legal fees and court costs for avoiding questioning under oath from Pacquiao’s lawyers in the case.

This has been a crazy year for Mayweather, who served a jail sentence earlier this summer for a misdemeanor domestic battery case. He was originally sentenced to six months in jail after pleading guilty to misdemeanor domestic violence—but three months of that sentence was suspended.

Mayweather was in jail when Forbes magazine named him the world’s highest-paid athlete for 2011. Mayweather’s fight vs. Miguel Cotto in May generated a whopping 1.5 million pay-per-view buys and $94 million in domestic pay-per-view revenue, according to HBO Sports, making it the second-highest grossing pay-per-view for a non-heavyweight fight in history.

No. 1 all-time remains Mayweather’s 2007 victory against Oscar De La Hoya, in which he also claimed a junior middleweight belt. That fight generated all-time records for any weight class with 2.46 million buys and $137 million in pay-per-view revenue.

So after pay days like that, a mere $50,000 at a strip club are just a trifle for this one-man sports conglomerate.

But before he gets too free with his money, we would like to whisper two words in his ear as warning: Mike Tyson.

About Nick Chiles

Nick Chiles is a Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist and New York Times bestselling author. He has written or co-written 12 books and won over a dozen major journalism awards during a journalism career that brought him to the Dallas Morning News, the Star-Ledger of New Jersey and New York Newsday, in addition to serving as Editor-in-Chief of Odyssey Couleur travel magazine.

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