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Monday, November 24th, 2014

LSU Offers Football Scholarship To 8th Grader Dylan Moses

There’s being ahead of the competition and then there’s what Les Myles did this week. The LSU coach who is known for his bold – and questionable – decisions during a football game and his staff offered Dylan Moses a scholarship for when he is ready to attend college. And that would be in 2017.

You see, Moses is 14 and headed to the eighth grade. That is not a typo.

Following a warped lead established by Washington, which had an eighth-grader commit to its school, the LSU coaching staff watched with amazement as the youth ran a 4.46 in the 40-yard dash at a Tigers’ football camp. Throw in that he is maturely built at 6-feet, 2o5 pounds, and the coaches were salivating.

The offer, though, even stunned the kid.

“I was kind of shocked when I first heard it — it was a dream come true,” Moses said. “I’ve always wanted to play for LSU since I was a kid, and now it’s coming true in front of my eyes.”

“The coaches told me they were offering — and they were serious. I thought they were playing,” Edward Moses said. “Really, I thought that they were joking around until I saw the serious look on their faces. So I rolled with it. Let’s see where it’s going to end up.”

Much has been made of the offer since word got out the Tigers were interested in a soon-to-be eighth grader. Indeed, even if he accepted the offer,  Moses couldn’t officially sign with LSU for another five years.

His workout numbers certainly don’t reflect that youth. In addition to the blistering 40 time, the middle-schooler posted a broad jump of 9 feet, 3 inches and a 34-inch vertical leap. Impressive as they were, the latter two weren’t so surprising to his father.

“I already knew that he could jump the 34-inch vertical, and we were actually working toward 9 feet in the broad jump. I didn’t think it was going to come then, but I felt it coming,” Edward Moses said. “The 40 — that blew me away. I wasn’t expecting a 4.46 40-yard dash.”

And he was not expecting his son to draw an offer this soon. “The coaches told me they were offering — and they were serious. I thought they were playing,” Edward Moses said. “Really, I thought that they were joking around until I saw the serious look on their faces. So I rolled with it. Let’s see where it’s going to end up.”

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